Help support TMP


"The Military Memoirs of an Infantry Officer 1809-1816" Topic


6 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

Please do not post offers to buy and sell on the main forum.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Napoleonic Media Message Board


Areas of Interest

Napoleonic

Featured Hobby News Article


Featured Link


Top-Rated Ruleset

Impetus


Rating: gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star 


Featured Showcase Article

28mm Soldaten Hulmutt Jucken

Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian paints the Dogman from the Flintloque starter set.


Featured Profile Article

Land of the Free: Elemental Analysis

Taking a look at elements in Land of the Free.


Featured Book Review


713 hits since 9 Apr 2023
©1994-2024 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango0109 Apr 2023 8:51 p.m. PST

Of possible interest?


Free to read


link

Armand

forrester10 Apr 2023 2:14 a.m. PST

Thank you, Ive only had a quick look but have saved the link.

Ive noticed that quite a few people who wrote their memoirs tend to try to tell the history of the campaign to the extent that their personal stories get a bit obscured.
WW2 memoirs are quite different.

42flanker10 Apr 2023 2:59 a.m. PST

It only gradually becomes apparent that the author of "The Military Memoirs of an Infantry Officer 1809-1816," James Hope (1786-1871), was a subaltern in the 92nd Highlanders when he began his service as part of Chathams's disastrous Walcheren expedition of 1809. His service alternates between the 2nd Bn.and 1st Bn. of the 92nd. From Essex he proceeds to Ireland, then to the Pensinsula and ultimately to the fields of Quatre Bras and Waterloo

Given the author's curious choice not to identify clearly his regiment and lacking the immediacy and personal detail of a Journal, this memoir, recollected in tranquility and first published in 1833, is a little colourless in its earlier chapters, involving long periods of service away from the action, but it becomes more vivid in its account of the Waterloo campaign.

14Bore15 Apr 2023 6:07 a.m. PST

Memoirs from the period often went weak criticism of comrades seeming due to fear of legal retribution. Anything bad gets whitewashed into the unknown.
That's what I often see in these.

Tango0120 Apr 2023 4:12 p.m. PST

Thanks

Armand

Brechtel19824 Apr 2023 3:29 p.m. PST

Memoirs from the period often went weak criticism of comrades seeming due to fear of legal retribution. Anything bad gets whitewashed into the unknown.
That's what I often see in these.

Are you referring to British memoirs?

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.