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"Salt Pork, Ship's Biscuit and Burgoo: Sea Provisions..." Topic


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940 hits since 23 Oct 2022
©1994-2024 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango0123 Oct 2022 9:30 p.m. PST

… FOR COMMON SAILORS AND PIRATES


""Englishmen, and more especially seamen, love their bellies above anything else."[1] This classic quote from Samuel Pepys summarized well the significance of food to sailors during the Age of Sail. Mariners could endure hard work and ragged clothing, but had little patience for short rations or rotten provisions. Pepys recognized this when he work for the English Royal Navy, and that, "any abatement from them in the quantity or agreeableness of the victuals," could turn sailors against serving the Navy.[2] The stereotype for the diet of sailors during the Age of Sail included ship's biscuit, salt pork, and rum. Many people at sea in that era ate or drank all the items in this cliché menu, but also consumed many other foods and drinks. Since food played a significant role in the lives of sailors, exploring the specifics of their diets can provide more insights into their experiences at sea.

Examining food for common-rank Anglo-America sailors in the various maritime services requires answering a variety of questions:…"


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Armand

Personal logo Murphy Sponsoring Member of TMP24 Oct 2022 9:14 a.m. PST

A well written and referenced piece.

Shagnasty Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2022 11:23 a.m. PST

An excellent article.

Escapee Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2022 7:55 p.m. PST

Good one, Armand!

Tango0125 Oct 2022 3:46 p.m. PST

A votre service mes amis…


Armand

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