Help support TMP


"Pommel Holster Question" Topic


4 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

Please don't make fun of others' membernames.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the English Civil War Message Board

Back to the 18th Century Discussion Message Board

Back to the Renaissance Discussion Message Board


Areas of Interest

Renaissance
18th Century

Featured Hobby News Article


Featured Link


Featured Ruleset

Wargame Rules for the Period 1500-1660


Rating: gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star 


Featured Showcase Article

Battle-Market: Tannenberg 1410

The Editor tries out a boardgame - yes, a boardgame - from battle-market magazine.


Featured Workbench Article

Building the Langton Anglo-Dutch British 1st Rate

Personal logo Virtualscratchbuilder Supporting Member of TMP Fezian is a big fan of the Age of Sail, and these ships really speak to him - he loves transitional eras, and the Anglo-Dutch Wars was one of those.


Featured Book Review


879 hits since 13 Mar 2022
©1994-2023 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Stoppage14 Mar 2022 9:36 a.m. PST

There appears to be two modes for a pommel/saddle holster:

Closed – large flap visible at side, no visible pistol handle.

Open – Large flap now next to saddle pommel. Pistol handle visible, spare cartridges revealed (inside edge).

Question: Were there two positions for the pistol? One sat well in the holster (for closed) perhaps handle forwards; and the other standing proud out of the holster with handle backwards for access?

79thPA Supporting Member of TMP14 Mar 2022 1:13 p.m. PST

I imagine that the pistol remained firmly seated regardless.

I read that pistol butts were backwards to facilitate an off hand draw or a cross draw since one of the hands was the primary reign hand. Personal taste may have also been a factor since art shows the pistol butt both forwards and backwards.

steve dubgworth30 Mar 2022 11:56 a.m. PST

i always thought the flaps (however elaborately decorated) were on every holster to protect the weapon and the powder from wet weather. they would then be folded back when the troops went into action for ease of access – butt forward or backwards being a matter of personal choice. the cartridges could have been on the flap but why? in battle at close range would there be time to reload? of course they could withdraw and reload but prepared cartridges would be better in a sealed pouch than on the flap. reloading is a delicate process on foot but on a nervous horse it would be a good trick. the rider needs both hands.

Heedless Horseman Supporting Member of TMP23 Sep 2022 6:38 p.m. PST

Pretty sure most holsters would have had some sort of flap that would be tucked back at need.
Butt forward makes sense… crossdraw much easier in a saddle.
NO reloading in combat unless withdrawn while a couple of other ranks go in to fire… and problematic, even then.

I am surprised that most pistols / carbines do not appear to have rings for lanyards? In 'Battle'… (probably rather more staid than assumed)… weapon re-holstered… but in melee… NO time for that! But, very expensive kit to drop.

I have only played 'silly games' with a bunch of other horsepersons…. but they were very 'confused'! Controlling, moving, identifying… WITHOUT swords or being shot at… well !
Melees… probably to be avoided! Maneuver instead! Only 50/50 chances in melee… and no time to muck about!

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.