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"Philadelphia Associator flags" Topic


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1,104 hits since 17 Jan 2021
©1994-2022 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

John the OFM17 Jan 2021 9:54 a.m. PST

link
Check out his other items also.

These are best guess recreations from flags designed by Ben Franklin.
The designs are confirmed by this newspaper or broadsheet contemporary illustration regarding a muster for the Paxton Boys incident. (Something eerily familiar today, sadly.)

picture

These appeared in past TMP discussion on possible flags.
I'm getting them Monday.
We are woefully lacking in flags for the AWI. Although the Paxton Boys incident occurred in 1764, it's quite likely they could be used in the FIW if your scenario includes Associators.
I'm going to print them up with the Union for the AWI, but debase it, or stripe it out, as was done with the guidon for the Philadelphia Light Horse.
Jordan gives options for 10 different designs, with either red or blue backgrounds, and as they say in Phillie regarding cheesesteaks, "wid er widout" the Union.

My Associator figures include Old Glory AWI Continental Marines, the hat is similar but lacking the distinctive "buck tail", and Continentals with Associator heads from Kings Mountain. I've also put those same heads on OG Continentals. Cadwalder is a Perry Colonel with a KM head.

Now, for some alternative Trenton scenarios, and certainly Princeton!
My Light Horse are the long OOP Firing Line, absolutely superb figures.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP17 Jan 2021 10:34 a.m. PST

Sheldon's 2d Continental Light Dragoons carried a standard, as did the Philadelphia Light Horse.

Webb's Continental Regiment carried colors and Washington's headquarters flag is easily painted, even in smaller scale.

John the OFM17 Jan 2021 12:08 p.m. PST

Errr, yes.
So did Pulaski's Legion.

AICUSV17 Jan 2021 11:26 p.m. PST

John have a copy of an article that appeared in the Philadelphia Ledger pre 1750. It describes a parade of the Associators in Philadelphia. The main idea of interest me was a description of the"gayly painted cannons" . It appears that no only were they painted in bright colors, but also included designs. If I can find the article (been about 20 years since I last saw it) I'll post a copy.

I also remember reading some place that it was conjectured that Franklin used some of the designs from the Associator colors on the Continental money.he printed.

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP18 Jan 2021 4:29 p.m. PST

Thank you, OFM. The Associators aren't presently on my list, but I've seen family surnames on the rosters.

Old Contemptible18 Jan 2021 7:42 p.m. PST

Thanks OFM! I picked up several flags that I have been looking for.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP19 Jan 2021 6:43 a.m. PST

There is a good book on the Associators: The Pennsylvania Associators 1747-1777.

Apparently, at their formation the Associators definitely had colors at least designed and approved. Whether or not they lasted to the Revolution is probably a good guess.

From page 49:

'In accordance with Article One, every Associator carried his own privately purchased musket, cartridge box, and hanger. Each regiment from Philadelphia or near Philadelphia designed its own silk color, 'painted' according to [Benjamin] Franklin, 'with different Devices and Mottoes which I supplied.' One of the devices bore the motto 'Pro Patria' and depicted 'a Lion erect, a naked Scymeter in one Paw, the other holding the Pennnsylvania Scuthcheon,' or shield. According to Franklin, Philadelphia women raised funds for the flags, as well as drums for signaling, spontoons for the officers, and halberds for sergeants. Pole arms, spontoons, and halberds signified rank and could be used to direct and maneuver soldiers.'

The references for the above section include American Military Shoulder Arms: Colonial and Revolutionary War Arms by George Moller; Franklin's Autobiography; Redcoat and Brown Bess by Anthony Darling; and the Pennsylvania Gazette.

In one of the footnotes, the cost of colors is mentioned, specifically the embroidered standard of the Philadelphia Light Horse Troop costing nine pounds, fifteen shillings.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP19 Jan 2021 6:55 a.m. PST

So did Pulaski's Legion.

Among other units. See Standards and Colors of the American Revolution by Edward Richardson.

Some of the flags shown and described in the book, though not limited to, are:

-Numerous 'Liberty' flags.
-7th Pennsylvania flag.
-13th Continental Regiment.
-Flag of the Bedford Minutemen.
-3d Continental Light Dragoons-'The Eutaw Flag.'
-two battalion colors of the Continental Corps of Light Infantry.
-3d Connecticut Regiment of 1775.
-Delaware Militia Color.
-Blue standard of the 2d New Hampshire Continental Regiment.
-Buff standard of the 2d New Hampshire Continental Regiment.
-3d New York Regiment.
-2d Pennsylvania Regiment of 1777.
-The Rhode Island Regiment of 1781 (two standards).

There are also numerous naval ensigns, both Continental and State, shown and/or described.

This is a very useful volume which anyone interested in the Revolution and who owns and paints military miniatures should have on their bookshelves.

Unofortunately, at least one Continental naval ensign is being disgraced with current events and that is a great shame.

dBerczerk20 Jan 2021 9:57 a.m. PST

Fortunately, at least one Continental naval ensign is currently being flown proudly in defense of the Republic, and that is truly inspiring.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP20 Jan 2021 11:13 a.m. PST

If you're referring to the Gadsden ensign then it is being dishonored by sedition and treason. That isn't 'defense of the republic.'

John the OFM20 Jan 2021 11:15 a.m. PST

Boys, take it to the Blue Fez.
This is supposed to be about Associator flags.

However, there is certainly a parallel between the Paxton Boys incident and today. White supremacists marching on the state capitol, with the Associators, being Citizen Soldiers, prepared to repel them.

John the OFM20 Jan 2021 11:23 a.m. PST

By the way, due to the lack of data we have concerning authentic AWI flags carried in battle, we who actually game in the period will clutch at whatever we have.
A good case can be made for the Paxton Boys Incident flags being carried in the FIW. That is, if the Associators actually had any real field battles. I don't think the French made it as far as Philadelphia.

However, Seymour's book does show a continuity to the Associators up to the point Pennsylvania finally got around to passing a for-real militia act.
The Associators were balked from Crossing the Delaware st 1st Trenton, but did make it across a little late. They were definitely at Princeton, maybe Assunpink Creek.
I have no qualms about using the same flags there, perhaps with the Union defaced, as was done with the Light Horse guidon.

AICUSV23 Jan 2021 9:36 p.m. PST

Actually John, during the FIW there were some actions within the then Philadelphia County. Indian raids. In 1777-78 Pennsylvania changed its military laws, the Associators were incorporated into the new militia divisions.

John the OFM25 Jan 2021 7:51 p.m. PST

Thank you. That's good to know.
Sadly, actions against Indians usually didn't require flags. grin

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