Help support TMP


"Unloading horses from boats by the Romans et al." Topic


9 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Ancients Discussion Message Board


Areas of Interest

Ancients

Featured Hobby News Article


Featured Link


Featured Ruleset


Featured Showcase Article

Gladiators & Centaurs

Blue Table Painting paints some of the latest releases from Bronze Age Miniatures.


Featured Workbench Article


Featured Profile Article

Dung Gate

For the time being, the last in our series of articles on the gates of Old Jerusalem.


422 hits since 6 Jan 2021
©1994-2021 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

UshCha06 Jan 2021 11:21 a.m. PST

Was it possible to unload sufficient horses from boats to make up a small cavalry contingent. If so how was it done:-
1) By beaching the boat. I did put allowing the boats to dry out but in the Med tides are not really a "thing".
2)Only at a dock so they can "easily" be walked off the boat.

Why, because I want some amphibious landings so I can surprise the fort(s)I am just building (see Crenelations the Dilemma in the 3D print thread).

GurKhan06 Jan 2021 11:57 a.m. PST

Caesar took cavalry with him on both his British expeditions; the first time storms prevented the cavalry from landing, but on the second trip they did get ashore. So it could be done, but he doesn't tell us how they were landed.

Earlier, the Athenians originally carried horses in any old ship, but from 430 BC they took to converting old triremes to carry 30 horses apiece = see for instance link for instance. The Romans may perhaps have done something similar.

Wackmole9 Supporting Member of TMP06 Jan 2021 12:07 p.m. PST

During the 1066 campaign the Norman just offload them and let them swim a shore.

79thPA Supporting Member of TMP06 Jan 2021 12:24 p.m. PST

A couple of links for you:

link

link

UshCha06 Jan 2021 12:42 p.m. PST

Thanks folks, that's a great set of information. GurKan great link I read a lot more fascinating.

RudyNelson06 Jan 2021 7:16 p.m. PST

Even in the Mexican-American War, unloading horse from the ship was an issue. One Quartermaster Lt. Simply removed the rails and pushed the horses off. Some swam the right way, to shore. A few swam in circles.

Personal logo BigRedBat Sponsoring Member of TMP07 Jan 2021 10:36 a.m. PST

Why not call them Batavians, and let them swim to land? The Batavians excelled in this tactic (Anglesey, the Medway). Then you can save the boats for your infantry.

Swampster08 Jan 2021 4:06 a.m. PST

It is much later than your period, but beaching a galley in the Med could be done in a beach invasion – Joinville contrasts how the galleys could get up to the beach while the round ships couldn't.
They wouldn't be beached enough to disembark dry shod, but good enough to unload.

He also talks about horse transports but this is probably not as relevant for you – they are following on from 1000 years of development by Byzantines and Arabs from Roman ideas.

Personal logo jdginaz Supporting Member of TMP08 Jan 2021 10:08 a.m. PST

Even in the Mexican-American War, unloading horse from the ship was an issue. One Quartermaster Lt. Simply removed the rails and pushed the horses off. Some swam the right way, to shore. A few swam in circles.

I believe that was actually the Spanish-American war. They ended up getting all the horses ashore by having an on shore bugler blow recall.

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.