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"Galloway Hoard cross revealed in its original glory" Topic


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©1994-2022 Bill Armintrout
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Tango0116 Dec 2020 4:19 p.m. PST

"An Anglo-Saxon silver cross from the Galloway Hoard has been revealed in all its intricate glory after being cleaned and conserved by experts at the National Museums Scotland (NMS). The Greek cross is decorated with black niello enamel and gold leaf typical of Late Anglo-Saxon design. Each arm bears the symbols of the four evangelists (Matthew's divine man, Mark's lion, Luke's cow, John's eagle) with floral swirls and knotwork surrounding them. It was made in Northumbria in the late 9th century and is extremely rare. Only one other Anglo-Saxon pectoral cross from this period is known, and it is nowhere near as elaborately decorated.

"The cleaning has revealed that the cross, made in the 9th century, [has] a late Anglo-Saxon style of decoration.This looks like the type of thing that would be commissioned at the highest levels of society. First sons were usually kings and lords, second sons would become high-ranking clerics. It's likely to come from one of these aristocratic families."…"

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Amicalement
Armand

Extrabio1947 Supporting Member of TMP16 Dec 2020 4:24 p.m. PST

Such beauty hidden under all that muck! What a work of art.

gavandjosh0216 Dec 2020 11:07 p.m. PST

stunning

Dn Jackson Supporting Member of TMP17 Dec 2020 12:15 a.m. PST

Beautiful

Tango0117 Dec 2020 12:23 p.m. PST

Glad you enjoyed it my friends! (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

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