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"Killer Instinct: How One Man Taught U.S. Rangers to Fight" Topic


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390 hits since 18 Nov 2020
©1994-2020 Bill Armintrout
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP18 Nov 2020 8:57 p.m. PST

…Dirty in WWII

"Lecturing to a group of young U.S. Army Rangers on a field at Fort Meade, Maryland, in May 1942, U.S. Army lieutenant colonel Francois d'Eliscu ordered a trainee to level his rifle and bayonet and charge at him, full bore.

"Come on, boy, like you mean business!" d'Eliscu shouted. His voice was startlingly loud and sharp, especially considering that it came from such an elfin, exotic-­looking figure. Just 5 feet 5 and weighing 136 pounds, d'Eliscu was in his mid-40s and had a shiny balding head and finely chiseled features. The "Little Professor," as some called him, had an intense glare and animated gestures—almost like a French intellectual debating over coffee in a Left Bank cafe. He had several graduate degrees and had taught at prestigious American universities…."
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Amicalement
Armand

Legion 418 Nov 2020 9:50 p.m. PST

thumbs up

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP19 Nov 2020 11:00 a.m. PST

Glad you enjoyed it my good friend! (smile)

Amicalement
Armand

Personal logo The Virtual Armchair General Sponsoring Member of TMP19 Nov 2020 11:55 a.m. PST

Damnation! That's was ONE TOUGH BIRD!

TVAG

Berzerker7319 Nov 2020 1:36 p.m. PST

Fascinating article, thanks for sharing!

Augustus19 Nov 2020 6:24 p.m. PST

Very interesting article!

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP20 Nov 2020 12:04 p.m. PST

Happy you enjoyed it too my friends! (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

Andy ONeill21 Nov 2020 9:14 a.m. PST

Never heard of him previously.
Some of the techniques seem rather unusual.
I wonder how much real world use one would get out of the neck-breaking-tree-tie.

Legion 421 Nov 2020 3:24 p.m. PST

We learned some close combat techniques including using a combat knife. It is also a bit of a confidence builder to a point. But you never really know when you may have to use it.

Andy ONeill21 Nov 2020 4:44 p.m. PST

In close combat, the simpler the better. The more complicated your technique, the longer you're going to take to learn it and the more things are going to go wrong.

Pointy things are easy.

I think seconds with a bic will beat a year training with a flexible weapon.
Never tried a piece of sash cord but chains are quite hard.

Legion 422 Nov 2020 7:21 a.m. PST

I'd go with that as well …

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