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"“And what do we mean by the Revolution? The War? ..." Topic


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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP14 Sep 2020 1:01 p.m. PST

… That was only an effect and consequence of it." — John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815


"The history of the American Revolution really begins with the French & Indian War (1754-63), without which no rebellion would have taken place when it did. We read about the French & Indian War at the end of Chapter 3. The British took over North America at the end of the war, ruling the region north of Florida and west to the Mississippi River. Take a look at the map above. Colonists wouldn't have broken from Britain if they still needed their protection from the French (green), who'd blocked western expansion in the Ohio Valley. Americans and Redcoats fought together against the French but, as the saying goes, familiarity breeds contempt, and colonial militias resented the contempt of their superiors in the British military. More importantly, some colonists didn't think that they needed the British anymore and the population inhabiting these growing, resource-rich colonies was virtually self-selected for rebellion against authority, many of its settlers having emigrated from the British Isles to seek greater freedom. They bristled under British attempts to keep them near the East Coast and quarreled over financial issues regarding taxes and trade. By 1763, it was time to dust off the Join, or Die. woodcut Ben Franklin had printed in 1754 to rally colonists on behalf of the British against the French; but, this time, they were rallying against their own rulers.

After the French & Indian War, the British tried and failed to defuse Indian conflict along the frontier by drawing a Proclamation Line down the spine of the Appalachian Range (red line above), barring settlement west of that boundary. The British were overextended financially and geographically after their win over France and they wanted to push more settlers along a north-south axis to Anglicize French Canada (make it more English) and establish a claim to Florida. The border wasn't effective in keeping settlers like Daniel Boone from going west and caused resentment among those who suspected that the British were trying to hem them in so as to better control and tax them. Fighting Indians along this frontier during Pontiac's War of 1763 galvanized settlers even more, forging unity they later employed against the British…"

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Amicalement
Armand

Personal logo John the OFM Supporting Member of TMP14 Sep 2020 1:26 p.m. PST

Interesting read.

Normal Guy Supporting Member of TMP15 Sep 2020 7:27 a.m. PST

I've always felt that calling it the American War of Independence was more accurate.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP15 Sep 2020 7:28 a.m. PST

When teaching US history I always described the American Revolution as occurring from 1763-1789 with the beginning of British 'interference' with the colonies after the French and Indian War and ending with the adoption of the US Constitution.

The War of the Revolution, of course, was from 1775-1783 concluding with the Treaty of Paris.

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP15 Sep 2020 1:10 p.m. PST

Glad you enjoyd it John… (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

Bill N16 Sep 2020 8:12 a.m. PST

I know it is semantics Kevin, but I think it would be more accurate to say the escalation of British interference with the colonies after the F&IW. British interference would go back at least to the Navigation Acts passed by the Commonwealth.

Brechtel198 Supporting Member of TMP16 Sep 2020 9:47 a.m. PST

There were a series of Navigation Acts passed by the British government since the middle of the 17th century. That's just a little early for a cause of the Revolution.

There was also one passed in the 14th century before the American colonies existed.

RudyNelson16 Sep 2020 11:31 a.m. PST

The War for Independence is better.
The war was closer to a civil war than a revolution anyway.

Personal logo John the OFM Supporting Member of TMP16 Sep 2020 12:59 p.m. PST

When teaching US history I always described the American Revolution as occurring from 1763-1789 with the beginning of British 'interference' with the colonies after the French and Indian War and ending with the adoption of the US Constitution.

Which is pretty much what John Adams wrote to Jefferson late in his life.

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