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"The Return of the Revolver!" Topic


25 Posts

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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP03 Sep 2020 10:10 p.m. PST

"Revolvers are an iconic piece of American history and a symbol of the American Cowboy around the world. These lethal tools of the much romanticized Old-West, are ingrained into common American culture and psyche, causing a deep seeded love affair with the revolver. This great evolutionary step forward for firearms came when the 1836 with Samuel Colt's rotating cylinder loaded with six shots. This placed a great deal of firepower in the hands of the shooter, up until the revolver, each shot would mean a reload or swapping to a backup gun. The wheelgun allowed for the much romanced Old-West and its outlaws and gunfighters, rich movie characters, like Dirty Harry, and even up until the later 1980's, most police departments were still wielded the deadly Dirty Harry .44 magnum.

However, the death of the service revolvers was began in 1911, when the US military made an automatic clip pistol the official sidearm, and over the next century, ACP's being less prone to jams, and continued to improve until the revolver was soon abandon by the police departments around the world, tje FBI, and most hobby shooters. It seemed that the revolvers were a dying breed.That was until recently, the revolver is regaining ground in firearm sales and re-development more powerful loads like the Taurus Judge. Revolvers are finding new fans in the world of self-defense firearms with these new revolvers firing shotgun shells coupled with the new Moon-Clips.Revolvers were part of my life, due to my father is an old-school wheelgun man, at an early age, my father instructed me with an .357 single-action Ruger Blackhawk. Added to this, was my great-grandfather and grandfather both were lawmen in New Mexico, both my brother and I have their old revolvers. Even now, I still like the simplicity of the old wheelgun, and the ceremony in cocking back the hammer and spinning the chamber…"

picture


Main page
link

Amicalement
Armand

Thresher01 Supporting Member of TMP03 Sep 2020 11:51 p.m. PST

Ah, thought so, a stunning, and very young, Raquel Welch.

Don't think I've ever seen this image of her, or the movie it is from.

She is lovely.

Gaz004504 Sep 2020 2:02 a.m. PST

Hannie Caulder….good movie!

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP04 Sep 2020 8:21 a.m. PST

It is hard to beat the reliability of a good old revolver – not all those springs to break and jam

Garde de Paris04 Sep 2020 9:48 a.m. PST

You made me look, Tango! I may even be able to read the article someday!

GdeP

StarCruiser04 Sep 2020 11:50 a.m. PST

Not sure if that was written in English or…what?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP04 Sep 2020 12:30 p.m. PST

(smile)

Amicalement
Armand

Personal logo deadhead Supporting Member of TMP04 Sep 2020 2:41 p.m. PST

I cannot believe Raquel Welch ever looked that good. The furry bikini, fighting dinosaurs, impressed me as a teenager, but this is a fine image of her….back then.

The article seems to have been written by a chap of Hispanic origins, to judge by his text. His command of English beats mine of any second language…by a long way!

donlowry04 Sep 2020 4:51 p.m. PST

Just recently I was reading a who-dunnit in which young police cadets (Canadian) encounter a revolver (the murder weapon, left at the scene) and are not sure what it is. Are revolvers that out-of-style?

In the USAF in the early '60s I was trained on a .38 revolver and owned, at the time, a Ruger .22 magnum.

Oberlindes Sol LIC Supporting Member of TMP04 Sep 2020 8:43 p.m. PST

Ah, thought so, a stunning, and very young, Raquel Welch.

She was 31 when she made Hannie Caulder.

It's on Amazon Prime streaming service.

joedog04 Sep 2020 9:03 p.m. PST

donlowry – some Canadians may not recognize any firearm.

bandit86 Supporting Member of TMP04 Sep 2020 10:34 p.m. PST

I did this a while back, halfway down when you get to the women
link

Personal logo Condotta Supporting Member of TMP05 Sep 2020 8:35 a.m. PST

There is a reduction of forensic evidence if using a revolver. This may be an advantage since the spent cartridges stay in the wheel chamber. Unlike a semi-automatic, spent cartridges in a revolver don't go spewing all over, hitting your mate to the right, and leaving evidence to link the shooter through the brass lying all over.

😃 of course there would likely be plenty of other evidence. Best practice is don't get involved in an activity where evidence can be used against you. Ha

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP05 Sep 2020 11:37 a.m. PST

Nice building bandit88!

Amicalement
Armand

Oberlindes Sol LIC Supporting Member of TMP05 Sep 2020 1:51 p.m. PST

Nice work, Bandit86.

Oberlindes Sol LIC Supporting Member of TMP05 Sep 2020 1:56 p.m. PST

Best practice is don't get involved in an activity where evidence can be used against you. Ha

That's always sound advice.

Also: don't carry your regular phone to the place where you don't want evidence used against you: link

Also, if you think you're going to need more than 6 shots, you probably want something more than a pistol anyway.

Thresher01 Supporting Member of TMP06 Sep 2020 4:04 a.m. PST

That's why gunslingers carry at least two of them, and sometimes a rifle too.

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP06 Sep 2020 3:04 p.m. PST

Ha!….

Amicalement
Armand

Trajanus08 Sep 2020 8:59 a.m. PST

Another advantage is that if you come across a revolver, there's less to do to check and make it safe.

Ms Welch turned 80 last weekend.

This is her keeping the crew in order!

link

Wolfhag Supporting Member of TMP08 Sep 2020 10:05 a.m. PST

There is a reduction of forensic evidence if using a revolver. This may be an advantage since the spent cartridges stay in the wheel chamber. Unlike a semi-automatic, spent cartridges in a revolver don't go spewing all over, hitting your mate to the right, and leaving evidence to link the shooter through the brass lying all over.

Very true. However, you can go to the range and pick up someone else's brass the day before your operation (wipe prints). After shooting with your 9mm or .45 auto police up your brass and drop the ones that belong to someone else but you'll need some time for that.

If you do have to leave your brass behind change barrels and firing pin ASAP. It's harder to change barrels on a revolver. A Ruger 10/22 rifle has an easy to change barrel too.

Wolfhag

Personal logo Condotta Supporting Member of TMP08 Sep 2020 7:55 p.m. PST

Wolfhag, I like it. Binary trigger on your 10/22? If so, this means you'll need to replace that brass quickly and thoroughly, which may be impossible. Solution? Don't keep squeezing the trigger. 😄

Another forensic trick is to grab a bag of hair from the bin outside the local barbershop and sprinkle that hair all around. It'll drive the lab mad. Or, just post some photos of Rachael in that costume to distract investigators.

Wolfhag Supporting Member of TMP10 Sep 2020 10:54 p.m. PST

Condotta,
No binary trigger but they are nice.

My wife watches a lot of those detective and murder mysteries. I think for hair forensics you need to have the hair follicle intact. That shows it was pulled out and the follicle has the DNA. So if you are going to do something nefarious get the hair from your mother-in-law's hairbrush.

It's a really cool rifle with so many modifications available. They now have an attachment that allows you to screw on a silencer. I've had mine sine 1970.

Wolfhag

ScottWashburn Sponsoring Member of TMP12 Sep 2020 6:49 a.m. PST

As to revolver safety, we had a bizarre incident at the 135th Anniversary Gettysburg reenactment years ago. Some fellow in a cavalry unit had been out a few weeks before the reenactment live firing his Army Colt revolver and somehow on the last shot he fired there was a partial misfire and the bullet had lodged halfway down the barrel and the firer did not notice. Apparently he didn't bother to clean it either. At the reenactment his unit had a guest from France join them and he was lent a uniform and all his gear--including this revolver which had been loaded with blanks--but still with the bullet in the barrel. So during the first battle, this unsuspecting Frenchman fires what he thinks is a blank and the bullet comes out hitting and wounding another reenactor! All sorts of hysteria followed, including the Frenchman being arrested. I guess the moral of the story is to always closely inspect any firearm before you use it.

Wolfhag Supporting Member of TMP12 Sep 2020 6:14 p.m. PST

That's how Brando Lee died:
On March 31, 1993, Lee was filming a scene in The Crow where his character is shot and killed by thugs. In the scene, Lee's character walks into his apartment and discovers his fiancée being beaten and raped. Actor Michael Massee's character fires a Smith & Wesson Model 629 .44 Magnum revolver at Lee as he walks into the room.

A previous scene using the same gun had called for inert dummy cartridges (with no powder or primer) to be loaded in the revolver for a close-up scene: dummy cartridges provide the realistic appearance of actual rounds for film scenes that do not require the gun to be fired and use a revolver where the bullets are visible from the front. Instead of purchasing commercial dummy cartridges, the film's prop crew created their own by pulling the bullets from live rounds, dumping the powder charge and then reinserting the bullets. However, they left the live primer in place at the rear of the cartridge. At some point during filming, the revolver was apparently discharged with one of these improperly deactivated cartridges in the chamber, setting off the primer with enough force to drive the bullet partway into the barrel, where it became stuck (a condition known as a squib load). The prop crew either failed to notice this or failed to recognize the significance of this issue.

In the fatal scene, which called for the revolver to be fired at Lee from a distance of 3.6–4.5 meters (12–15 ft), the dummy cartridges were exchanged with blank rounds, which feature a live powder charge and primer, but no bullet, thus allowing the gun to be fired without the risk of an actual projectile. Since the bullet from the dummy round was already trapped in the barrel, this caused the bullet to be fired from the barrel with almost the same force as if the round were live, and it struck Lee in the abdomen.

Whenever someone hands you a weapon, check it out, even they just checked it before they gave it to you.

Wolfhag

Oberlindes Sol LIC Supporting Member of TMP13 Sep 2020 5:31 p.m. PST

Whenever someone hands you a weapon, check it out, even they just checked it before they gave it to you.

Sound advice and worth repeating.

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