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"Battle of Turin - 1706 - Castle of Lucento" Topic


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1,065 hits since 17 Jun 2020
©1994-2021 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

paperbattles18 Jun 2020 10:12 a.m. PST

Hi,
During this though period I went back to my original passion: the Diorama/Wargaming of the Battle (and Siege) of Turin (my town) in 1706.
Having some time to spend on it, I started some research on the part of the Battle where it was the Castle of Lucento, and where the French troops dug in (actually the Normandie Brigade and 3.000 Dragoons on foot).

To recreate the climax of this part of the battle, I firstly checked some old map of the epoch and hence reproduced my map of the castle itseld and of its surrondings

picture

link

After this I had the idea to rebuild in paper the Castle. In the meanwhile I reproduced the Second Battalion of the Piedmontese Reggimento Monferrato at 1:1 ratio


picture

picture

picture

picture

The papersoldiers are on a company/stand with a magnet to hold them (and to remove in case of wargaming)

ReallySameSeneffeAsBefore18 Jun 2020 11:25 a.m. PST

That looks really good- nice effort.

paperbattles18 Jun 2020 12:20 p.m. PST

Thanks

18th Century Guy Supporting Member of TMP18 Jun 2020 3:56 p.m. PST

Very nicely done.

Glorfindel77703 Jul 2020 1:49 p.m. PST

Fantastic stuff. What always amazes me is the difference between our nippy table-top battalions and the real thing. They are simply huge and, when in line of battle, can stretch for hundreds of yards. No wonder it took so much time and effort to actually organise an army for battle, particularly in this era. When trying to manoeuvre, heaven help them if they meet rough terrain. Given the complexities, I almost get the impression that rival commanders wishing to give battle would have to make arrangements with each other to meet (similar to a duel).

Personal logo FlyXwire Supporting Member of TMP04 Jul 2020 6:07 a.m. PST

Loved seeing the project research here, and the resultant modeling.

paperbattles20 Jul 2020 4:10 a.m. PST

Thanks 18th Century Guy, Glorfindel and FlyXwire.
The difference in making a "nippy table-top battallion" and a 1to1 ratio battalion is that you will enjoy a lot of difficulties the real commanders had. For instance, all the wargame rules give fixed measures for a base of a battalion, but nothing is so distance from the reality than this. At the battle of Austerlitz – just to give an idea – 3 Russian battalions defended the village of Pratzen and each had just 150/200 men while a French battalion had around 800 men. TO represent them with the same size (even if with diffent forces) totally changes the reality of the Battle (imagine how easy the French Battalion could outflank the Russians).

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