Help support TMP


"Some Dinosaurs Regurgitated Pellets Just like Birds" Topic


1 Post

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Prehistoric Message Board


Areas of Interest

Ancients

Featured Hobby News Article


Top-Rated Ruleset

Tactica


Rating: gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star gold star 


Featured Showcase Article

Eureka Amazon Project: Nude Hoplites

Another week, another unit for the Amazon army!


Featured Workbench Article


Featured Profile Article

June Contest Winner: Hoplite Baggage Vignette

Yesthatphil is the winner of the June 2015 contest with this wonderful entry.


252 hits since 6 May 2020
©1994-2021 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP07 May 2020 2:55 p.m. PST

"Picture yourself in the Early Cretaceous Period. Ahead of you, beyond the edge of an ancient forest, you see the feathery form of a Utahraptor. She's a large one at least twenty feet long, and tall enough to easily rest her chin on your head. Mercifully, she's not close enough to do that. She's simply strolling by, totally unaware of you. Then she stops. A strange look of concentration manifests across her dinosaurian features, and, in one exaggerated motion, she closes her eyes and regurgitates a brown and white mass onto the ground. It's a pellet, the indigestible parts of her lunches over the past few days. With a snort, she stalks off after only she knows what.

We don't know for certain whether Utahraptor ever barfed pellets like modern owls do. No one has found an appropriately-sized bolus of iguanodont and sauropod bone chunks in the Early Cretaceous strata of eastern Utah. But we know that some non-avian dinosaurs related to the famous raptors vomited pellets like modern birds do. The evidence, paleontologist Xiaoting Zheng and colleagues write, comes from the roughly 160 million-year-old strata of China…"
Main page
link

Amicalement
Armand

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.