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"Treatment of War Wounds: A Historical Review" Topic


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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP27 Apr 2020 3:05 p.m. PST

"The treatment of war wounds is an ancient art, constantly refined to reflect improvements in weapons technology, transportation, antiseptic practices, and surgical techniques. Throughout most of the history of warfare, more soldiers died from disease than combat wounds, and misconceptions regarding the best timing and mode of treatment for injuries often resulted in more harm than good. Since the 19th century, mortality from war wounds steadily decreased as surgeons on all sides of conflicts developed systems for rapidly moving the wounded from the battlefield to frontline hospitals where surgical care is delivered. We review the most important trends in US and Western military trauma management over two centuries, including the shift from primary to delayed closure in wound management, refinement of amputation techniques, advances in evacuation philosophy and technology, the development of antiseptic practices, and the use of antibiotics. We also discuss how the lessons of history are reflected in contemporary US practices in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The need for surgical care of survivors of accidents or animal attacks is part of the story of civilization, as is the story of medical care of those wounded in that other peculiarly human endeavor, warfare [41]. During the past 250 years, and particularly during the 20th century, developments in military trauma care for musculoskeletal injuries have greatly influenced civilian emergency medicine. The history of military trauma care must be understood in terms of the wounding power of weapons causing the injury and how the surgeon understood the healing process. Improvements in weapons technology forced surgeons to rethink their interventions in their effort to tip the odds of survival in favor of their patient…"
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Amicalement
Armand

Grelber27 Apr 2020 8:42 p.m. PST

Interesting article, Armand, though I ended up opening another window so I could look up all the medical terms.

Grelber

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP28 Apr 2020 12:59 p.m. PST

Happy you enjoyed it my friend!. (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

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