Help support TMP


"Russian Infantry in Overcoats Standing Order Arms Review" Topic


4 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Napoleonic Discussion Message Board

Back to the Napoleonic Product Reviews Message Board

Back to the Plastic Figures Message Board


Areas of Interest

General
Napoleonic

Featured Showcase Article

The Amazing Worlds of Grenadier

The fascinating history of one of the hobby's major manufacturers.


Featured Workbench Article

The 95th Rifles from Alban Miniatures

Warcolours Painting Studio Fezian does his research, selects his colors, and goes forth!


556 hits since 24 Feb 2020
©1994-2020 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP In the TMP Dawghouse24 Feb 2020 4:06 p.m. PST

"Many people today like to imagine Napoleonic battles as an epic canvas filled with thousands of men dressed in colourful and smart uniforms, and artists then and now like to oblige that perception. The reality was often a good deal more down to earth, with mismatched uniforms, clear signs of dirt and wear, and very often a much more practical garb being worn, namely weather-proof covers and the greatcoat. The greatcoat was particularly associated with the Russian infantry, where the voluminous garment was popular with the men because it was comfortable and warm, as was the forage cap. The appearance of these troops may not have been smart or impressive, but that would not worry them as they did their Tsar's bidding all over Europe.

All the other ranks here are wearing the greatcoat, which has been correctly done in the most typical design and so looks good. The lower legs show the men to be wearing gaiters over shoes, which just leaves the headgear to talk about. Four of the poses wear the forage cap, of a design that was introduced from 1811 and would last little changed for decades to come. The rest of the men wear a shako, which on three of the poses has had the plume removed and a cover placed over it. The remaining three poses have no cover, so that we can see the badge and cords around it, and the long thin plume assigned to grenadiers from 1811 also. The men's kit begins with a rectangular knapsack held by two shoulder straps connected by a third across the chest, attached to which is a water flask. Each man also has a cartridge pouch on the right hip and a haversack on the left; the latter not being issued but widely worn nonetheless. The pouch has a triple-flamed grenade badge on it, as do the uncovered shakos, which confirm the identification of these men as grenadiers rather than musketeers. Lastly each man seems to have a sabre partly covered by the haversack, but there is no sign of a bayonet scabbard anywhere…."

picture

picture

picture

Main page
link

Amicalement
Armand

Widowson26 Feb 2020 1:41 p.m. PST

This is just my opinion, but:

"Many people today like to imagine Napoleonic battles as an epic canvas filled with thousands of men dressed in colourful and smart uniforms, and artists then and now like to oblige that perception."

Isn't that why we collect and paint Napoleonic figures? If you want dull, collect and paint the World Wars.

Marc the plastics fan26 Feb 2020 2:33 p.m. PST

Agreed. And the pose is dull. Easy to mould, but not enough for me

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP In the TMP Dawghouse27 Feb 2020 11:29 a.m. PST

Glup!…


Amicalement
Armand

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.