Help support TMP


"Metal rods on sixteenth century artillery pieces?" Topic


9 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Renaissance Discussion Message Board

Back to the Renaissance Product Reviews Message Board


Areas of Interest

Renaissance

Featured Hobby News Article


Featured Ruleset


Featured Showcase Article

Oddzial Osmy's 15mm Teutonic Crossbowmen 1410

The next Teutonic Knights unit - Crossbowmen!


Featured Profile Article

Dung Gate

For the time being, the last in our series of articles on the gates of Old Jerusalem.


Featured Book Review


697 hits since 28 Oct 2019
©1994-2020 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Paskal Supporting Member of TMP28 Oct 2019 7:38 a.m. PST

Hello All,

On the illustrations of many artillery pieces of the sixteenth century we see metal rods connecting the wheel axles to the carriages of these pieces, someone knows what they were and what they served?

Thanks

Son of MOOG28 Oct 2019 9:50 a.m. PST

My understanding is that they were braces to strengthen the carriage against they violent recoil of they guns and also to steady the carriage during transport over the very poor roads of the time.
Hope this helps.

Tom D

Paskal Supporting Member of TMP29 Oct 2019 12:08 a.m. PST

It is a solution, but the roads were still for centuries as they were in the sixteenth century and yet this equipment has disappeared well before.

Puster Sponsoring Member of TMP29 Oct 2019 9:49 a.m. PST

I simply assumed they were for better handling of the guns, but I just realize that this is just an assumption and I simply do not know of their exact function.

Needs investigating…

Charge The Guns29 Oct 2019 3:14 p.m. PST

The only explanation I have read is the same as Son of MOOG – greater strength to the carriage. Perhaps production and metallurgy improved which removed the need for them?

Son of MOOG30 Oct 2019 4:21 a.m. PST

I think it also had to do with the shifting of the design of the carriage from the medieval "no wheel/four wheel naval style" to the "modern" two wheel style. In attempting to lighten the carriage for easier man-handling they substituted metal re-enforcing rods for less wood.
In the end it was found to be unnecessary and the support rods disappeared.
This is the summary for what I have read in a couple of books regarding Renaissance warfare.
Hope this helps.
Tom D

olicana01 Nov 2019 8:00 a.m. PST

I think SoM has it about right. A simple case of over engineering the product, no doubt helping to impress the buyer with 'new technology'.

cplcampisi01 Nov 2019 10:47 p.m. PST

I simply assumed they were for better handling of the guns, but I just realize that this is just an assumption and I simply do not know of their exact function.

Needs investigating…

I thought that they may have been places were drag ropes could be attached -- but I don't know how I formed that opinion either.

Often times they appear to be a kind of linkage, which, to me, doesn't appear that it would have much of a stiffening effect on the carriage. But I don't know.

Paskal Supporting Member of TMP03 Nov 2019 1:17 p.m. PST

Well it seems that it has nothing to do with the state of the roads, it was just for shooting, especially for the recoil, so that the piece does not fall apart !?

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.