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"Color of Mexican artillery carriages during Revolution " Topic


6 Posts

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19th Century
World War One

279 hits since 22 Feb 2019
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Comments or corrections?

coolyork Supporting Member of TMP22 Feb 2019 9:57 p.m. PST

Im guessing a shade of grey and perhaps some green depending on its origin. Just though I would ask before I paint some . Thanks in advance !

rvandusen23 Feb 2019 6:33 a.m. PST

Back in 2013 I had compiled as much research as possible on the Texas War for Independence. Some of this should apply to the revolutionary period. Here is what I conjectured about the old ordnance at the Alamo:

"Finding information on the color of Mexican gun-carriages proved somewhat difficult, but the consensus appears to be that the carriages were left as oiled wood with black iron fittings. I decided to use a little artistic license and painted some guns in the old Spanish livery: greyish blue for field guns and red for siege and fortress guns. The 18 pounder was an American piece brought to Texas by the New Orleans Greys, so I assumed that the 18 pounder would have been in the colors of the U.S. artillery. In the end my colors were as follows: The 18 pounder painted light greyish blue with black metal parts, the 16 and 12 pounders painted dull red with black metal fittings, the 8, 6, and 4 pounders painted mostly natural wood with a medium greyish blue carriage here and there, In the case of the six pounders I painted two cannons iron and the rest bronze. The pedrero painted iron while the pair of 3 pound swivels brass."

rvandusen23 Feb 2019 6:36 a.m. PST

Were the guns of the Mexican revolutionary army mainly captured Spanish pieces? The may have still been painted the blueish grey for field guns and the red for siege and fortress guns.

coolyork Supporting Member of TMP23 Feb 2019 1:01 p.m. PST

rvandusen , Thanks for all the great info, I should have been more specific however . The Revolution period I need info on is the 1910-1920 period . Once again sorry for being so vague in my post ,I am however putting the info you sent in my file for the future .

Henry Martini23 Feb 2019 6:01 p.m. PST

I've only managed to find one colour photo online: of a surviving Mondragon 75mm gun. It's one of the six purchased by Israel and used in the 1948 war. It's painted in a sand shade; but of course there's no way to know whether this is its original colour or the Israelis repainted it in line with their own equipment paint scheme.

Given the circumstances of the 1948 war, with the Israelis desperately rushing into action any equipment they could scrounge, my guess is that repainting would have been a luxury they couldn't afford the time for, however, if the guns remained in service after the Israeli victory I suppose it's possible they might have been repainted during the post-war period.

Richard Baber25 Feb 2019 4:42 a.m. PST

https://mondragonrifle.com/history

I went for faded browns, khakis, greens and greys
link

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