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"Norwegian architecture 1940 - any Norwegians here?" Topic


4 Posts

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432 hits since 18 Jan 2019
©1994-2019 Bill Armintrout
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Fred Cartwright18 Jan 2019 7:57 a.m. PST

Found this interesting site that shows comparison pictures of Norway from around the turn of the 20th Century (circa 1980-1910) and modern times (circa 2004-14). Clearly a lot of old buildings have survived, particularly churches, but even the centre of Oslo you can recognise many of the buildings. Rural buildings seem to be mostly wood, even today, although the early buildings are rough cut, log cabin style, while the modern ones are sawn timber, would the sawn timber buildings be more common in the 1940's or is that more post war? Rural roads are unmetalled in the early pics and metalled surface in the modern shots. Again was this a prewar change or post war? Link to site link

Extrabio1947 Supporting Member of TMP18 Jan 2019 10:16 a.m. PST

Gunfreak? This is right in your pilot house.

dapeters18 Jan 2019 1:37 p.m. PST

Norway up until the discovery of north sea oil and been relatively poor. It estimated that nearly have the population left over a 40 year period for North America a century ago

keithbarker19 Jan 2019 1:42 a.m. PST

Not sure about Norway, but based on what I know about Sweden I would suggest the following.

Log cabin style would have been popular until the middle of the 1800s after which sawn timber would have been more popular. However many log cabin style buildings would have still been in use during WW2.

In the 1920s they started using gravel or concrete on major roads. Asphalt became common in the 1950s although it was first used in Stockholm 1876 (Stora Nygatan).

Hope this helps!

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