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"Field Rations and Space Food " Topic


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266 hits since 3 Jul 2018
©1994-2018 Bill Armintrout
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP03 Jul 2018 10:14 p.m. PST

"Napoleon once said: "that army marches on its stomach", and how true he was. While we live in the 21st century with all manner of modern technology, soldiers and astronauts still need to eat. Military rations are the subject of jokes and insults, but the modern military field ration packs is lightyears better than the Bleeped text that my Grandfather ate in World War II and Korea. Today, the can has been replaced by the vacuum sealed pouch of various packs that all contain thousands of calories, and while these 21st ration packs are better than cans of old, but they still receive their share of mockery. In this blog article, we will exploring and explaining military field rations, space food, and some examples of "future food".

What are Field Rations?
There is a separation between military rations and field rations. Unlike chow prepared in the mess hall, which is military rations, the field rations are designed for in-field nutrition. Field rations are prepackaged meals designed specifically for the needs of the soldiers during deployments in the field and the conditions the soldiers may find themselves. Given the chaos of in-field conditions, field rations are constructed to be minimum preparation and to maximum the nutrition. This means they are calorically dense, weather-tight, and needing little or no outside gear with the in-packaging heating chemicals to make the meal that much more special.

What is Space Food?…."
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Amicalement
Armand

Tgunner04 Jul 2018 6:51 a.m. PST

It's dehydrated food. Mostly freeze dried fruits and ice cream!

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I remember freeze dried strawberries showing up in MREs when I was in the Army back in the early 90s.

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NASA does that too.

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Very crunchy, but toss in waters and it becomes normal strawberries. It's "space food" because stuff like this was used by NASA. It costs thousands of dollars to send just a pound of weight into space so NASA looked for ways to reduced weight to save money. Dehydrated food was one way to cut costs.

Zinkala04 Jul 2018 10:50 a.m. PST

Slightly stupid but serious question here. If all the rations shipped into space are dehydrated where does the water come from to make it edible? Do they have a good enough recycling system to keep the water exports down to a minimum?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP04 Jul 2018 10:50 a.m. PST

Thanks!

Amicalement
Armand

Lion in the Stars04 Jul 2018 2:26 p.m. PST

If all the rations shipped into space are dehydrated where does the water come from to make it edible? Do they have a good enough recycling system to keep the water exports down to a minimum?

Yes, NASA does have a very good water-recycling system.

Remember, there are lots of uses for water, so while there are water deliveries every so often it's mostly for washing.

Tgunner05 Jul 2018 5:08 p.m. PST

They do take liquid water with them into space for various reasons including drinking. So all Buz and Neil need to do is just pour some water from their drink into their pack strawberries and there you go: nice, juicy strawberries.


GI Joe and John do the same thing except the water comes from their canteen.

Aldroud14 Jul 2018 5:40 a.m. PST

The saddest thing I ever learned about space is that weightlessness causes a condition akin to diabetes. That NASA ice cream? Yeah, astronauts can't really eat that.

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