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"Japanese Typ 95 HA-GO Tank" Topic


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390 hits since 11 Jun 2018
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Tango0111 Jun 2018 9:56 p.m. PST

"Type 93 and Type 94 light tanks were produced from 1938 and were accepted into service by the Japanese Army eventhough they did not fulfill the requirements of light tanks according to the Japanese High Command. As a result in 1934, Mitshubishi Heavy Industries produced a prototype of a light tank, which after successful tests was put into production as Type 95 Ha-Go (known to the Japanese Army as Ke-Go). Light tank Type 95 had simple construction, which did not complicate production process. It was designed in mind with future operations in areas with soft and even muddy ground. The tank had very well designed suspension, which allowed constant contact of roadwheels with the ground even in heavy cross-country conditions. The use of leather washers in engine covers, located below the level of air intakes, allowed the tank to travel in water as deep as 95cm for long periods of time. High engine power ratio and good ground clearance allowed the tank to have very good cross-country capabilities. The main faults of the this tank (as every other Japanese tank) were light armor protection and lack of radio equipment. Only commander's vehicles were mounted with radio, while crews of regular tanks used signal flags. Type 95 tank from the second half of 1930s and during WWII was the main light tank of the Japanese Army. It was produced until 1943 and total of 1300 tanks was produced."

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Amicalement
Armand

Mark 112 Jun 2018 1:41 p.m. PST

Hmmm. Not too sure about this source.

Type 93 and Type 94 light tanks were produced from 1938 and were accepted into service by the Japanese Army eventhough they did not fulfill the requirements of light tanks according to the Japanese High Command. As a result in 1934, Mitshubishi Heavy Industries produced a prototype of a light tank…

OK first off, it just doesn't make sense. How can you see that something you take into service in 1938 doesn't fit your needs, so you start an alternative project in 1934?

Q. "When is the best time to plant a lemon tree?"
A. "You should plant it 4 years ago."

Oh, and there was no such tank as a Type 93 light tank in Japanese service in WW2.

There was a Type 92. And there was a Type 94. And BTW the Type 94 (designed based on the British Mk VIb, IIRC) entered production in 1935, not 1938, and was considered pretty OK by the IJA for it's intended role, which was as a recon tankette. It was considered successful enough that over 800 of them were built.

Which raises another interesting point (not a criticism of this article, just an interesting point). Many of us often think of Japanese tanks as backwards, obsolete, and rare.

But the Type 94 was very comparable to European tankettes and light tanks in 1935-1939. It is no less than a L3-35, a Mk VIb, a Pz I, an R-1 or a T-40. And it was built in respectable numbers.

And the Type 95 was very comparable to European light tanks in 1939. A 37mm gun and 40Kph speed. Compares well enough to an A9, an M11/39, a Pz 35t or 38t, or a T-26, or even an M3 Stuart. And it was also built in very respectable numbers.

Of course when you put a Type 95 against a Sherman in 1944, you may find it mis-matched. But the same is true for a Pz 38t facing a T-34 in 1943.

-Mark
(aka: Mk 1)

Garand12 Jun 2018 1:50 p.m. PST

The big issue with Japanese tanks is that they could not maintain being competitive over time. So while the Type 95 was a competitive light tank in 1938, the chassis didn't allow for much space to upgrade with more armor or better armament. The same is true with the Type 97. By the time th Japanese were building or designing competitive tank designs, the war was pretty much over.

Damon.

Legion 412 Jun 2018 3:08 p.m. PST

From a design standpoint … the IJF's AFVs were pretty much second rate at best. As were much of their ground force weapons. One historian said something like, "They were "amateurs" when it came to many of the small arms and tanks. " I'd have to go with that.

E.g. when the USSR invade Manchuria in '45. Imagine a Type 97 or any of their MBTs/AFVs vs. a T34/85, SU-100, etc. … I know who my money is on …

Tango0113 Jun 2018 11:33 a.m. PST

Many thanks!.

Amicalement
Armand

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