Help support TMP

"The French Army of the Orient 1798-1801: Napoleon's" Topic

14 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.

Back to the Napoleonic Media Message Board

567 hits since 23 Jan 2018
©1994-2018 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango0123 Jan 2018 3:13 p.m. PST

….beloved 'Egyptians' (From Reason to Revolution)

"More than 200 years ago – under the inspiration and leadership of Bonaparte – a revolutionary French Army invaded Egypt, then part of the Ottoman Empire; this presence lasted beyond Bonaparte's own departure and subsequent rise to power as First Consul. It ended with another invasion – this time by the British – and the repatriation in France of what was left of the 'Army of the Orient'. The birth of Egyptology; the rise of modern Egypt; the demise of the Ottoman Empire; and start of 'the great game' have all been often told and studied, but what is less well known is that as the French found themselves stranded in a foreign land – profoundly alien to them in culture and climate – they had to adapt to survive. Egypt was a proving ground for many officers and ordinary soldiers who were to rise to prominence during the Napoleonic period. Some of Napoleon's future inner circle – like Davout, Savary and Lasalle – were first spotted by the young Bonaparte in Egypt, and although initially unplanned as such, it turned out to be the first attempt by the French to build a colony on the African continent. It especially led the French Army to adopt totally new clothing and equipment; to organise native units; and even to draft men from faraway Darfur into its own ranks. Drawing from a wealth of original primary material – much of it never published or even seen before – this study focuses on the French Army of the Orient and its organization, uniforms, equipment and daily life. It aims at providing a renewed and updated image of the French soldier, as told by the surviving archives, memoirs and rare contemporary iconography."
Main page

Have anyone read this book?
If the answer is yes… comments please?

Thanks in advance for your guidance.


TMPWargamerabbit23 Jan 2018 9:18 p.m. PST

Book just arrived…. haven't had the evening to read or look at yet except for a quick glance. Looked promising.

BillyNM24 Jan 2018 10:45 a.m. PST

Yes read – loved it all, well worth the money – is there any specific aspect of it you want assurance on before buying?

Tango0124 Jan 2018 11:16 a.m. PST

Many thanks!.

Not really… only if some fellow members like it or not…


NapStein27 Jan 2018 8:45 a.m. PST

Hi Armand,

it is "state of the art" research in modern publication format; Yves did a lot of research also in Vincennes. So regarding the (smaller) page number it is a real must have for that rarely covered period. And personally I hope that Yves will do an additional book about the English army (also rarely covered for the Egyptian war).

Greetings from Berlin
Markus Stein

Gazzola28 Jan 2018 9:12 a.m. PST


I've got the book and really enjoy popping into it now and again, along with other titles. A recent bout of the flu had been preventing me from doing any heavy reading or considering any reviews. It is a good title but perhaps tries to cover too much in such a short volume of 128 pages. The book does show how well the French troops fared, considering they were trapped there without means of supply or reinforcements, and it is very interesting how they coped when Napoleon returned to France. It is amazing they managed to stay there and hold on for as long as they did and it seemed it needed an assassination to turn things bad for them. It stands well alongside Napoleon's Egyptian Campaign 1798-1801 by Michael Barthorp (Osprey MAA No 79) and French Soldier in Egypt 1798-1810 by Terry Crowdy (Osprey Warrior No 77) I think it can still be obtained for around £17.00 GBP-20 with free postage.

Tango0128 Jan 2018 3:37 p.m. PST

Many thanks my friends!. (smile)


arthur181529 Jan 2018 6:00 a.m. PST

Armand, I agree with the comments above. I have a review copy which I would be very happy to let you have for far less than the published price, if you're willing to pay the postage costs.
If you like contact me using my TMP handle AT yahoo DOT co DOT uk
Best wishes, Arthur

Tango0129 Jan 2018 11:53 a.m. PST

Many thanks for your offerd my good friend… but because of my work….I have the chance to obtein it from others friends… practically free….


Lilian30 Jan 2018 7:23 p.m. PST

about what wrote Markus, actually I don't think that Yves will be the author for the British because the Editor wanted to publish 3 and it had precised in a reply to…him :) in a napoleonic forum

Dear Markus, a companion volume on the British troops in Egypt, by Carole Divall, is in preparation and will be published next year

written in 2017 so "next year" is now this year 2018

We are still looking for someone to complete the trilogy and write on the Turkish forces in this campaign: if anyone is interested, contact details for the series

I suggested to contact Chris Flaherty, I don't know the fate of this planned third volume…

Yves having multiple others topics of interest, the Polish or the Imperial Guard etc…as he wrote in conclusion in the Helion & Co's blog about his book :

NapStein31 Jan 2018 1:15 p.m. PST


thanks for the update – o.k. Yves has many interests (like many of us :-)), and particularly Polish troops are a real favorite of him, as he has private connections to Poland and so may use originally polish sources.

So, awaiting what will come … and I'm happy if Carole Divall's work will be published during this year.

Greetings from Berlin

Lilian10 Mar 2018 12:42 p.m. PST

…for october 2018

completed by the Ottoman for 2019

dibble10 Mar 2018 2:28 p.m. PST

As It's by Carole Divall, It should be an excellent addition.

I have all of Carole's books, all of them are well worth the money.

Paul :)

von Winterfeldt11 Mar 2018 11:55 p.m. PST

already interesting the cover, I was under the impression that the artillery had already changed to white turn backs in 1800

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.