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"With the "Eagle Takers": the Peninsular War ..." Topic


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385 hits since 4 Sep 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
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Tango0105 Sep 2017 3:20 p.m. PST

…Experiences of Hugh Gough with the 87th (The Prince of Wales's Own Irish) Regiment of Foot.

"Those who know anything of Hugh Gough will probably know of him as the general who defeated the Sikhs of the Punjab and finally secured the Indian sub-continent for the British Empire. In common with many senior officers of the Victorian age, Gough learned his craft as a young soldier in the British Army at war with the Napoleon's French forces in Spain. There he proved himself to be an outstanding and highly regarded regimental officer. His regiment, the 87th, was comprised of hard fighting Irishmen and eventually became The Royal Irish Fusiliers. For those interested in the Peninsular War this book will be especially noteworthy because much of its content concerns the comparatively little reported campaign in Andalusia. Not only did Gough and the 87th fight at Barrosa, but there they took the Imperial Eagle of the French 8th Ligne regiment-the first Imperial Eagle to be taken in battle in Spain by the British Army. This volume, extracted from a biography of Gough's entire career, also provides vital insights into the siege of Tarifa. Notably, it was also the 87th who captured Marshal Jourdan's baton at Vitoria-yet another singular distinction of the Peninsular War. This Leonaur original includes extensive use of Gough's own words, written while campaigning in Spain, together with maps and illustrations not present in the original. Gough's personal experiences are complemented here by a short history of the 87th during the Napoleonic Wars"

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Anyone have read this book?
If the answer is yes… comments please?

Thanks in advance for your guidance.


Amicalement
Armand

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