Help support TMP


"The kingdom of Goguryeo" Topic


4 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Classical Asian Warfare Message Board



392 hits since 14 Aug 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP15 Aug 2017 3:19 p.m. PST

"Historical narratives lie at the core of national identity. As a result, competing interpretations of the past can come to define international relationships. Nowhere is this more evident than in Northeast Asia, where so-called "history wars," combined with the destabilizing growth of Chinese power, have contributed to a fraught security environment.

The best known of these disputes stem from Japan's annexation of Korea and occupation of much of China in the decades before 1945. But if arguments about the legacy of Japanese imperialism have occasionally united Beijing, Seoul, and Pyongyang against Tokyo, another quarrel with much older roots has the potential to pit both Koreas against China -- and could even play a defining role in Sino-Korean relations in the event of Korea's reunification.


To whom does Goguryeo belong?

In late January, 2013, South Korea's Hankyoreh newspaper reported that an elite group of scholars in the northeastern Chinese province of Jilin was conducting "closed research" on a freshly discovered stele, an engraved memorial stone dating to the fifth century A.D. What interest could the examination of such an artifact hold for contemporary Korean readers? "Concerns are being raised," the Hankyoreh piece noted vaguely, "that with key figures from the Northeast Project taking part in the research, it is very likely that China will use the results of the study … to reinforce its argument that Goguryeo belongs to China."…"
Main page
link


Amicalement
Armand

ricepot Inactive Member15 Aug 2017 4:39 p.m. PST

Back then there were only dynastic boundaries or tribal dominion. Such scholastic discussion are purely academic. Borders are determined by wars then and now.

But I sure like to see some Goguryeo 28mm figures :-)

goragrad15 Aug 2017 7:20 p.m. PST

Not inappropriate given the current situation, but somewhat dated – being originally written in 2012.

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP16 Aug 2017 9:41 a.m. PST

Ricepot… (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.