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"French ship, 89 guns - Langton" Topic


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15 Oct 2016 8:38 a.m. PST
by Editor in Chief Bill

  • Changed title from "French ship,89 guns - Langton" to "French ship, 89 guns - Langton"

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Ulterius15 Oct 2016 7:34 a.m. PST

If i can ask admin to delete older duplicate post on "Napoleonic Naval Painting Guides Message Board,thank you.
French hull,89 guns,entirely painted using oil paint (base as well),medium used are linseed and walnut oil,taking care of "fat over lean" rule.
I hope you like it,any advice is welcomed.

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Starting to work on 76 guns,Spanish hull – deck details.

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ModelJShip Supporting Member of TMP15 Oct 2016 11:48 a.m. PST

Well done, that is my favorite french hull to be painted.
I see that you learn quickly! ;-)

Ulterius16 Oct 2016 11:14 a.m. PST

@Julian – thank you,indeed it's nice hull to be painted.For sure it became my favorite one as well.
I'm happy to see that painting progress is recognised by a true artist.

whitejamest17 Oct 2016 12:04 p.m. PST

It looks great Ulterius. I've never seen one done with oil paints, but it looks like you've achieved excellent results with them. And the rigging is very neat and straight.

Kevin in Albuquerque17 Oct 2016 7:13 p.m. PST

I agree with James. Really interesting effect with oil paints.

Ulterius18 Oct 2016 8:16 a.m. PST

I'm glad you like it.

Oils have some very nice properties and i found that i can work better with them.

I forgot to mention that sea will change its color depending of the intensity of the light source.
During sunny days or high intensity light soruce the sea will have predominantly blue /dark blue color with very little green/yellow hue,as you can see on pics above.
During the cloudy day,as it's today,it will change color to dark/greenish/yellow gray color with dark-blue hue.


Sea during the cloudy day…
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Paint used…

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Stern (work in progress,oils as well) of the Spanish ship,base by Julian recipe :)

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ModelJShip Supporting Member of TMP18 Oct 2016 11:26 a.m. PST

I am glad to see that my little contribution is welcome! As you can see, this paper pulp is cleaner and better to apply than mastics and paper pulp don't crack over time.
It is a good contribution the idea of painting with oil paints. I do not control that technique of painting. Is it difficult?
I use alcohol to degrade the plastic paints I suppose oil paint technique has a similar dissolvent, hasn't it?

Ulterius18 Oct 2016 3:39 p.m. PST

Your contribution is greatly appreciated.
Adding varnish to the paper pulp mix,as you suggested in your tutorial,is a great way to avoid problems with mold by sealing all pores.Adding cobalt blue oil paint to the mixture instead of acrylic paint speeds up drying process.

I had problems controling the acrylics for some reason,colors are dull,layering will not work so well due to polymer emlusion in which pigment is suspended,which is by default very voluminous compared to oils.Diluting with acrylic dissolvent only worsen the problem with high voluminosity.However,that is what acrylics are and they do fine job for the branch of art for which they intended to impressionism.

Oils are another story,they have some strict procedure to be followed in order to secure proper drying time and avoid cracking.I found that i can control them very easly,imagined color i'm able to mix within a minute,that was not the case i had with acrylics.I was so thrilled seeing how well they behave so i decided to paint the stern of the ship above with "wet on wet" technique, unnecessarily maybe,but i had total control over the painting process,that's how i felt.
Oil paint can't not be dissolved with alcohol based solvents,turpentine or mineral spirit must be used.Turpentine is toxic and it's advisable to have your working space well ventilated if you gonna use it.
When we talk about thinning the oil paint then both thinners (turpentine and mineral spirit) destroys,to some extent,pigment on molecular basis which in the end results that oils lose they ability to provide so called "depth" in painting by reflecting lower layers of paint.So moderation in use of both thinners is best recommendation.
Both thinners used will gave matt finish to the paint as oposed of using only lineseed oil as diluting medium which have glossy finish when it's dries.

First layer of paint can be mixed only with some of the thinners,for each subseqent layer you reduce amount of thinner and dilute the paint only with oils (lineseed oil or some other drying oil),but there is also rule that to much oil (lineseed or any other drying oil) will cause yellowing and darkening of the color in a short time.Despite the fact that walnut or poppy seed oil will prevent yellowing of color to much of any oil is not good in any case.So again moderation is the key.However,since there is no washing technique,strictly speaking,in oil painting,there is only glazing.But glazing technique with oil is technique were paint is diluted with any drying only (thinners cannot be used!) to the consistency of acrylic wash…and as it's stated above to much oil will cause yellowing and darkening of the color,this is counteracted by knowing that glaze will darkening the paint and model or picture must be left to dry thoroughly in well luminated space .Basically do not left your model or paintings in a dark room till it's not completly dry.

For lighter colors walnut oil or poppy seed oil must be used as they prevent yellowing to extent,however poppy seed oil MUST always be last one used as a finishing layer as it have tendency to cracking the paint over the time.On the other hand walnut oil doesn't have this problem and can be used in any layer,but the price of it can be a issue.It's good to buy quality artistic grade lineseed oil which do not contain any of drying accelerators,like cobalt…
Also one can intentionally use lineseed oil when painting the sails…over the years sails will became and more yellowish.
Be aware that burnt umber is the fastest drying oil,if we use it alone then lineseed oil must be added (or any other drying oil except poppy seed oil).Due to his drying fast nature it will crack the paint within the months if not properly mixed with drying oils.

Beside thinners and oils to the oil paint mixture varnish can be added,providing transaprency effect,like the one you see in pictures by old masters.Damar varnish from art store or any other will do the work.I'm posting this picture from Ivan Aivazovsky one of the greatest marine artist as a example of using varnish to achieve transparency of the sea.

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I hope that you will find this short tutorial usefull.

ModelJShip Supporting Member of TMP19 Oct 2016 12:48 p.m. PST

Thanks for the explanation, it seems a complex process compared with acrylic paints. Clearly the effect on the picture is surprising! Good work on boats, congrats!

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