Help support TMP


"How do you make a "dial the yield" nuke?" Topic


10 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the Modern What-If Message Board



625 hits since 18 Mar 2016
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2016 1:57 p.m. PST

I have read that certain nukes can vary the yield desired, with a "simple" adjustment.
How is that done?
Why would you want to? Come on. You're dropping a nuke!

Personal logo Doms Decals Sponsoring Member of TMP18 Mar 2016 2:07 p.m. PST

Tritium or deuterium injection is the one I know of (gas is injected just prior to detonation, giving a neutron boost, increasing yield), but I'm sure there are other methods too. Also some nukes which incorporate a thermonuclear secondary can be adjusted so that hopefully only the primary goes off. As for why, I'd imagine if you have deluded hopes of preventing escalation, you might think a small nuke is better than a big one….

bbriarcliffe Inactive Member18 Mar 2016 2:09 p.m. PST

DELETED

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2016 2:42 p.m. PST

Why would you want to? The same reason we are so wound up in collateral damage concerns with conventional weapons.

If at might want to use a small nuke on Phat Daddie's governmental center when they are in session, but not want to kill or damage more than needed. Or a target might require a nuke for penetration but we want to minimize damage and radioactivity because friendly forces are coming in behind the attack. Or maybe they aren't coming in behind the attack but you want to limit the contamination while at the same time stopping the hordes from moving south across a certain parallel. There are other reasons as well.

picture

bbriarcliffe Inactive Member18 Mar 2016 3:23 p.m. PST

DELETED

tberry7403 Inactive Member18 Mar 2016 3:28 p.m. PST

No one wins a nuclear war. (Except maybe the cockroaches.)

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2016 4:34 p.m. PST

Maybe he is one?

Tom Bryant Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2016 9:49 p.m. PST

JJ laid out some good arguments for why. It gives the owner a higher degree of tactical flexibility and lowers ownership costs. Instead of having say 100 15 kt nukes, 75 50 kt nukes, and 20 150 kt nukes in your arsenal you could go with a "dial a "Yield" system for 100 150 kt nukes that are adjustable from 15 to 150 kt.

Another possible way of adjusting yield could be in the detonation sequencing and timing on implosion based devices. Optimal timing gives maximum yield where different sequencing delays ca lower the yield accordingly.

mckrok19 Mar 2016 7:39 a.m. PST

On early weapon designs, we'd change the sequencing and composition of the enriched and depleted uranium rings.

pjm

Personal logo capncarp Supporting Member of TMP23 Mar 2016 8:34 p.m. PST

<No one wins a nuclear war. (Except maybe the cockroaches.)>
Or the Twinkies.

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.