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"New wargaming book on the Paraguayan War" Topic


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brass1 Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2010 8:43 a.m. PST

I have just received a copy of Wargaming the Paraguayan War – 1864-1870, available from Amazon for $19. USD I won't try to post a comprehensive review because a. my knowledge of the conflict is basic at best and b. the author is my brother, but as a primer for gaming a conflict that is almost unknown in North America it looks pretty good. It includes a brief history, a separate list of battles, uniform/equipment/TO&E information, a more extensive bibliography than one usually sees in gaming-related publications, some brief advice on building miniature armies for the period, a half-dozen scenarios, and some selected orders of battle.

Some of you may have already played the Tuyuti scenario (one of six included), since my brother has run it at both Cold Wars and Fall In. The scenarios were designed to be used with Fire and Fury but should be easily transferable to other rules.

LT

Personal logo gamertom Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2010 9:05 a.m. PST

Does it include any information regarding the river ironclads and the battles they were in?

badger2224 Oct 2010 9:39 a.m. PST

Is that fire and fury, or Regiomental fire and fury?

brass1 Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2010 10:15 a.m. PST

Does it include any information regarding the river ironclads and the battles they were in?

There is a scenario (OB, battle description, and map but no specific rules) for Riachuelo. Barring a few references in the history section, that's about it. Sorry.

Is that fire and fury, or Regiomental fire and fury?

The Tuyuti and Curupati scenarios are set up for the original F&F; Corrientes is for the regimental version. OBs for other three (Banco de Itapiru, Riachelo, and Ytororo) are given in actual strengths and are non-rules-specific. My bad.

LT

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2010 11:42 a.m. PST

Thanks for the heads-up – this is one of my favourite "unknown" wars, and having the F & F scenarios will be great

sector51 Inactive Member24 Oct 2010 2:38 p.m. PST

There was a great series of articles on it, I think in Wargames Illustrated. A truly weird war.

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP24 Oct 2010 3:43 p.m. PST

It was a very weird war – little Paraguay declaring war on Brazil and then managing to drag in two more enemies – not to mention the near-total devastation of Paraguay, caused in large part by their obstinent refusal to recognize that they had been beaten

Leadjunky24 Oct 2010 7:36 p.m. PST

Anyone remember what issues of WI the acticles may have appeared?

Does the book contain color plates of uniforms or the like?

sector51 Inactive Member25 Oct 2010 2:25 a.m. PST

I think it might have been WI issues 44-48

Editor my Arse Inactive Member25 Oct 2010 4:25 a.m. PST

Interesting, thanks for the heads up. There already is a good wargaming primer in the form of the Foundry book by Terry Hooker but not in the price range of your brother's book. More titles on the subject are always welcome.

Really there is no excuse for it to be considered an 'unknown war' even to an English speaking audience. There are a number of English language titles books on the subject there was also a decent S&T boardgame(or was it Command?) and at least one possibly more English language Yahoo groups devotes itself to the conflict.

I would be interested to know whether the book was authored from primary source or secondary source material and whether there's a bibliography included. There seems to be an, albeit understandable, over-reliance on Spanish language sources by North American authors. Judging by the title, perhaps your brother has utilised Brazilian sources as the war is almost invariably known in Brazil as the Guerra do Paraguai.

kingscarbine25 Oct 2010 10:29 a.m. PST

It's unavailable on Amazon.UK

link

Leadjunky, WI info here:
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mashrewba25 Oct 2010 1:28 p.m. PST

There was the classic Freikorps 15mm range which stimulated interest a while ago.

brass1 Supporting Member of TMP25 Oct 2010 4:22 p.m. PST

I would be interested to know whether the book was authored from primary source or secondary source material and whether there's a bibliography included.

There are about two pages of bibliography; given that the titles are in English, I assume they are mainly secondary sources, although I know Richard Francis Burton and George Thompson were eye-witnesses.

LT

Editor my Arse Inactive Member26 Oct 2010 2:12 a.m. PST

Ok, thanks for that.

kingscarbine26 Oct 2010 8:15 a.m. PST

Malandro,

Are you Brazilian? Can you point me to good primary sources and on-line books, etc?

Personal logo vtsaogames Supporting Member of TMP26 Oct 2010 6:34 p.m. PST

But… but… but… I want to do the War of the Pacific 1879-1884 (Chile vs. Peru and Bolivia)… even though Lopez and the Paraguayans also call out to me…

And I haven't finished Wellington's army.

Happy Wanderer27 Oct 2010 3:22 a.m. PST

…and don't forget gents, Obscure Miniatures are just about to release a new modern multi pose 18mm figure range…….looks like the Paraguayan War finally comes together for the mini gamer.

HappyW

Editor my Arse Inactive Member27 Oct 2010 5:36 a.m. PST

@ Kingscarbine

For colour and a good generally accessible history, try the following (secondary sources).

Gen Paulo de Duarte Queiroz's four part work , 'Os Voluntários da Pátria na Guerra do Paraguai' That's probably the best work for wargamers. Plenty of detail and a goodly amount of colour. For some reason Vol 2 on Osorio's corps is the easiest to find but you can often find complete sets on Mercado Livre for as little as R$25,00 a volume.

Schneiders, 3 volume history 'A guerra da tríplice Aliança' is probably still considered a classic text. I don't have a copy myself but maybe your library system?

For uniforms, the seminal work is Gustavo Barroso's Uniformes do Exercito Brasileiro. Pretty much every colour plate you will see in any contemporary work owes its provenance to this wonderful title. Rare and expensive, I recently saw a mint copy in a antiquarian bookstore for R$2.500!!

Fortunately the whole text, colour plates included is available free, on-line:

link

In English a goodly part of Wigham's 'The Paraguayan War' is viewable courtesy of Google Books.

Here's a good web resource, in English:

link

I hope that is of some assistance.

Personal logo GeoffQRF Sponsoring Member of TMP27 Oct 2010 10:57 p.m. PST

We've offered the War of the Triple Alliance figures in 15mm for many years, supplemented by the Freikorp campaign book on the subject (which we hope to reprint, under the guidance of Terry Hooker, shortly).

Geoff
QRF
Www.quickreactionforce.co.uk

kingscarbine28 Oct 2010 1:57 a.m. PST

"Freikorp campaign book on the subject" If its what I have its hardly a book. More like a pamphlet. Will it be expanded?

kingscarbine28 Oct 2010 2:39 a.m. PST

Many thanks Malandro. Barroso's book is a gem! I'll see if I can find the others.

Abraço

Personal logo GeoffQRF Sponsoring Member of TMP28 Oct 2010 4:12 a.m. PST

Will it be expanded?

That's what we are just working on, only making it more of a potted campaign guide and painting guide.

docdennis1968 Inactive Member28 Oct 2010 10:01 a.m. PST

The only real problem for this project (war of the Triple Alliance) is for possible campaigns. How could you find anyone nutty enough to play Lopez well, and still be welcome in your home/clubhouse for "normal" activities. What a total bizzarro guy!!

Personal logo GeoffQRF Sponsoring Member of TMP28 Oct 2010 12:22 p.m. PST

Meglomanic = most wargamers I know :-)

Cuirassier28 Oct 2010 5:06 p.m. PST

It's good to see another Brazilian here!

I second Malandro's endorsement of "Os Voluntários da Pátria na Guerra do Paraguai" (Fatherland Volunteers in the Paraguayan War). There you will find everything you want to know about the Volunteer Battalions.

Francisco Doratioto's excellent "Maldita Guerra" (Damned War) was published in 2002.

BIBLIEX (Brazilian Army's publishing house)is republishing Augusto Tasso Fragoso's five part work "História da Guerra entre a Tríplice Aliança e o Paraguai".
link

Unfortunately, these books are available only in portuguese.

"The war in Paraguay: With a historical sketch of the country and its people" was written by George Thompson, an English engineer who was Lieutenant-Colonel of Engineers in the Paraguayan army and aide-de-camp to Lopez.
link

Lopez was a bloody dictator. Between June 19 and December 14 1868, 596 prisoners were executed or died in prison after harsh interrogation (aka torture). This data was taken from Solano Lopez' own diary. This list is only of those stated to have been concerned with an allegedly conspiracy against Lopez (see Thompson's book page 323). In fact, many more were executed during that period. Keep in mind, perhaps 1.000 prisoners, mostly innocent, were executed in a period of just 6 months. Thompson tells all.

Lopez executed and tortured members of his own family, including his own sisters.

Editor my Arse Inactive Member28 Oct 2010 7:39 p.m. PST

True, but arguably Lopez did set Paraguay on the path to where it sits today… a world economic powerhouse based on cheap plastic crap, knock off designer clothing, fake Rolexes and re-spraying and removing the chassis numbers off luxury cars stolen in Brazil.

Fortunately, Ciudad del Este, Paraguay's major commercial centre, is convenientally located on the border do you don't have to travel far into the country to enjoy its fabulous riches. ;-)

Editor my Arse Inactive Member28 Oct 2010 7:41 p.m. PST

And the truly bizarre thing about the place is that they still venerate Lopez. Then again there's a monument in Salvdor to the Fourth expedition against Canudos…. go figure.

kingscarbine29 Oct 2010 4:55 a.m. PST

@ Cuirassier

I'm Portuguese… But don't let that ruin the beginning of a beautiful friendship. :D

Thanks for the links. I'll see if I can get some of the titles through the Brazilian Embassy in London.

Abraço

Cuirassier29 Oct 2010 6:08 a.m. PST

So… You are Portuguese, eh?

Damn Portugueses! I hate them! :-)

Nah… Not really. They are a good people. :D

This book will also interest you: link

Um grande abraço.

kingscarbine29 Oct 2010 9:28 a.m. PST

Thanks,

This one also looks interesting:
link

Editor my Arse Inactive Member29 Oct 2010 1:39 p.m. PST

'brigadão, eu não vi esses.

Leadjunky29 Oct 2010 7:36 p.m. PST

Thanks for the info kingscarbine. Looks like I had most of those issues.

Personal logo John the Greater Supporting Member of TMP02 Nov 2010 9:41 a.m. PST

I'm glad to see that Brass1 set off a great discussion on the Paraguayan War (aka, War of the Triple Alliance, Great Paraguayan War or Lopez War). I will refrain from commenting on the book, as I am the author, except to say that I set the price as low as possible to get the the word out about this important and little known war (at least, little known in the English-speaking world).

I hope to see some of you at Cold Wars. We are doing Tuyuti again.

Cuirassier02 Nov 2010 12:36 p.m. PST

I applaud your initiative, John the Greater.

I would like to ask a favor… Could you post some photos of past Tuyuti games?

My great-great-grandfather was present at Tuyuti. He was an engineer and, when the war broke out, joined a volunteer unit. He received a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Volunteer Infantry Corps (actually a battalion), made the entire campaign, was wounded twice and awarded with many medals.

His unit, the 2nd Volunteers was formed in Rio de Janeiro in 1865 (Rio was the capital of the Brazilian Empire). Late in 1866, the unit was renumbered from 2nd to 24th Volunteers. The 24th suffered heavy casualties during the "dezembrada" – the bloody battles that finally destroyed the Paraguayan army in december of 1868 – and was disbanded in late 1868 (the survivors were absorbed into other units).

The 24th Volunteers started the month of december with 530 men in its ranks. After 2 battles (Itororo and the first attack against Lomas Valentinas), the battalion was left with only 93 effectives (the unit lost 437 men).

Personal logo John the Greater Supporting Member of TMP03 Nov 2010 11:24 a.m. PST

Cuirassier:

I'd be happy to post some pictures. Your family story is great. You highlight one of the frustrating things about tracing units for the Brazilians as they kept merging units and recycling the unit numbers. Thus the 24th Voluntarios in December of 1868 is different from the 24th in May of 1866.

I have a copy of a brief memoir by Francisco Pereira da Silva Barbosa who served in the 1st Volunteers which is a great story of itself. My translation from the Portugese is a bit rough. Being a bit of a Luddite, it may take me a few tries to get it posted.

Myrmidons03 Nov 2010 8:39 p.m. PST

I definitely going to purchase that book. It looks like a very interesting time period and region.

kingscarbine04 Nov 2010 7:03 a.m. PST

Found this absolutely fantastic site with downloadable PDF documents (in Portuguese): historiar.net

Personal logo John the Greater Supporting Member of TMP04 Nov 2010 1:55 p.m. PST

azmodels:

Thanks for saying you want to buy the book. I pitched the book idea to Osprey last year and they turned me down. They said it was a specialized "niche" that would not sell. I didn't ask them why they thought that a book on castles of the Cathars was mainstream (yes, they have published that)but one on the largest war ever in South America was a niche.

Cuirassier04 Nov 2010 9:34 p.m. PST

Take your time, John. ;-)

As pointed before, I highly recommend you to read "Os Voluntários da Pátria na Guerra do Paraguai" by General Paulo de Queiroz Duarte.

Duarte spent many years researching the history of the Volunteer battalions. He explored many archives (National Archives, each state archives, etc) and discovered many forgotten documents and interesting records, including hundreds of After Action Reports from battalion and brigade commanders. The author tells the story of each Volunteer battalion in detail.

Editor my Arse Inactive Member05 Nov 2010 1:39 a.m. PST

Speaking of which. I have just commissioned some 28mm miniatures depicting volunteers in campaign dress. Compatible with Perry ACW and with variants in kepi slouch hat and forage cap.

More details to follow closer to the date.

kingscarbine05 Nov 2010 2:30 a.m. PST

Malandro,

How big, and receptive, is the South American market to a 28mm Paraguayan War range?

kingscarbine05 Nov 2010 6:59 a.m. PST

Finally received my Foundry book. Looks good but there are many Portuguese and Spanish typos. Would like to see more OOB's and battle plans/troops positions. Thumbs up nonetheless.

Editor my Arse Inactive Member05 Nov 2010 11:17 a.m. PST

South American market? What South American market? If wargaming is a small niche market in Europe and the US try and imagine what it is like in a developing nation. Big taxes on imports don't make it easy.

The figures are largely for my own interest but will be available through an established manufacturer. I suspect the market will be 90% from Europe and the English speaking world which is where 90% of the wargaming market seems to be. I might try and interest various museums. When I have a precise timeline on the greens, masters and production figures I will update.

In Brazil there are a number of gamers in SP and Rio. There was a small company in Rio that was/is producing some fantasy and had plans to produce some figures for the Paraguayan War but I'v heard no more of them. Riachuelo Games IIRC. Maybe Cuirassier will know more.

In Salvador, Brazil's third largest city, there isn't anyone that imports or makes miniatures. Th closest thing to miniatures was a little shop an hour out of town in Praia do Forte that used to sell a small selection of traditional lead toy soldiers, quite bizarre. Gone the last time I looked, a few months ago.

I've had a cursory look in some other South American cities. Apart from model kits and some platic figures the only things I have seen in Chile were 54mm toy soldier types. I did stumble across a shop in Buenos Aires selling, amongst other things, a limited range of 25/28mm figures and to be honest I suspect that some of those were recasts.

tirofijoisback Inactive Member06 Nov 2010 1:49 a.m. PST

Right Malandro – there is hardly much of a market for books in general in South America (at least in Chile, Venezuela and Colombia), let alone wargaming related stuff. Having said that, I think that Buenos Aires has a number of good book shops, but thy're the only ones I've seen on the continent. I have never been to Brazil though – what are the book shops like there?

Cuirassier06 Nov 2010 10:17 a.m. PST

Brazilians simply don't give a damn about our military history. Most of my friends couldn't care less about military history.

Malandro, I haven't heard much from Riachuelo Games lately.

Here's their website: riachuelogames.com.br

Rio de Janeiro has great book shops, but good military history books are very rare to find. One of these book shops, called "Leonardo da Vinci", has some imported military history books.

Editor my Arse Inactive Member06 Nov 2010 12:10 p.m. PST

"Brazilians simply don't give a damn about our military history…."

All too true, sadly, although there are some decent museums. The Museu do Expedicionário in Curitiba is excellent and the Museum at Forte de Copacabana isn't bad at and as an added bonus the coffee there is very good. :-)

"Rio de Janeiro has great book shops, but good military history books are very rare to find"

Alas, also true. But if you think it's difficult finding books in Rio, try Salvador. I'd say that 80% of the bookshops in town are those selling evangelical tracts for simple people.

There is an excellent secondhand bookshop in R. Ruy Barbosa. They have a small military history section and that's where I most recently saw a copy of the Barroso book. Apart from that the best bookshop is Livraria Multicampi, also in Centro but the selection of military history is tiny.

I've had some luck in second hand shops in Copacabana. There's a good little bookshop called Livros, Livros e Livros in R. Rainha Elizabeth that occasionally has some gems, they had the old three volume 'História do Exército Brasileiro', last time I was there. Actually, despite being dated, it's a surprisingly good primer. It was written during the ditadura so the third volume has some bizarre passages but as a general introduction to Brazilian military history it's still a useful book.

There's another little shop in R. Francisco Sá, if I remember correctly, that also has some interesting finds from time to time.

Cuirassier07 Nov 2010 8:48 a.m. PST

Malandro,

Museu Conde de Linhares is one of the best military museums in Rio de Janeiro. It's located in São Cristovão.

Take a look at these photos taken at the Conde de Linhares (click on the images to enlarge them):

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Two captured Paraguayan cavalry swords
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The museum has a lot more to offer, of course.
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The other great military museum is the Naval Museum.

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Admiral Barroso
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Brazilian Navy during the War of the Triple Alliance

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IRONCLAD BRASIL (built in France and commissioned in 1865)
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IRONCLAD SILVADO (built in France and commissioned in 1866)
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MONITOR ALAGOAS (built in Rio de Janeiro and commissioned in 1867)
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In 1868, when a six-ship squadron, 3 monitors and 3 armored corvettes, forced the passage in front of the powerful fortification of Humaitá, the Alagoas was hit more than 150 times. Only 2 of the shots which struck her pierced the armor. Take a look…
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The 6 ships received a total of 380 hits. The Brazilian squadron was successful in its mission.

IRONCLAD TAMANDARÉ (built in Rio de Janeiro and commissioned in 1865)
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Medals and Orders from the Empire
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This is a tiny part of the museum's collection.

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Although not a genuine military museum, the best museum in Rio de Janeiro is the National Museum of History. There are a lot of military history related stuff on there.

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Paraguayan cannon "El Cristiano". This monster was captured in 1868.
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Not related to the War of the Triple Alliance, but interesting nonetheless.

French cannon employed during the 1711 French invasion of Rio de Janeiro.
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Other stuff…

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Unfortunately, the Empire Wing (1822-1889) is currently undergoing restoration.

Sorry guys… I got a bit carried away. ;-)

Editor my Arse Inactive Member07 Nov 2010 1:36 p.m. PST

"Sorry guys… I got a bit carried away. ;-)"

Not at all. Thank you.

The National History Museum I have been to but I must admit whilst I have been past it several times I have never quite found time for Museu Conde de Linhares which is funny, as I have a friend who lives nearby to São Cristovão. I must rectify this ommission at the earliest opportunity.

kingscarbine08 Nov 2010 3:40 a.m. PST

Here a some interesting articles about the Paraguayan Navy and the battle of Riachuelo:

link
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Personal logo John the Greater Supporting Member of TMP08 Nov 2010 7:48 a.m. PST

I have posted a few pictures from the Battle of Tuyuti in 15mm using Fire & Furt rules.

link

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