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Homemade Palm Trees, Part II: The Painting


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CIA Games writes:

Fantastic and a scratch builder's dream article! Thanks for this. The method couldn't be simpler and none of the materials are exotic or hard to acquire. When I get back to my Pulp Egyptian game, there's going to be a bunch of these on the table!


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26 June 2012page first published

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Dervel Fezian writes:

I like to spray-prime with black, but either before or right after applying the primer, add a drop or two of superglue to the top and bottom to secure the branches in position.

A touch of superglue at the top

A touch of superglue at the roots

Painting the trees is pretty easy, and depends on personal preference. I like to use Ceramcoat or similar acrylics for terrain projects. I use a very thick coating of dark brown for the trunk. Then Black Green for the base coat of the palm fronds.

Applying the basecoat

A brighter green for the next coat on the leaves, and then a very bright green drybrushing to finish.

Brighter green for the leaves

Followed with drybrushing

Next, a quick drybrush on the trunk of lighter shades of brown.

Drybrushed trunk

Now you are ready to glue them to a base. This is where the roots come in handy. I like to use five-minute epoxy for this.

Gluing the trees down

And here you see some finished trees. Two are being planted on this still-in-process DBA camp. The process is reasonably scalable, and, of course, no two trees will look exactly alike.

Finished palm trees