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New Gate


Jovian1 writes:

Of course – you probably live on the East Coast – where things are relatively new – and those which went before have been obliterated by time. Out West – we have LOTS of history – most of it is actually "pre-history" because we were the first to write down what it was, like teepee rings, buffalo jumps, burial grounds, and the like – no large buildings made by man, just places where man congregated and lived hundreds and in some places thousands of years ago.

To say America has a poor sense of history is to say that it is full of stupid people based solely on the musings of people caught on the street and deemed suitable for late night talk shows to make fun of them.



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Revision Log
22 August 2008page first published

1,764 hits since 22 Aug 2008
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
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sargonII, traveling in the Middle East, writes:

Close up of New Gate, looking north

The New Gate was built in 1887, to provide access to new neighborhoods growing outside the city walls.

Firing hole for arrows - later used for rifles and machineguns

The gate is near the northwestern corner of the city, and is on a hill that slopes down towards Damascus Gate in the east, and Jaffa Gate in the south.

To the east of New Gate

The gate allows automobiles to enter the old city.

Tower to the west of New Gate

This gate was breached in 1948, by 15 July 1948, 0300-0545.

New Gate entrance from the north

Fifty Sternists attacked the old city wall, near the northwestern corner, and 50 Irgunists attacked the New Gate from Notre Dame with two large bombs to blow the wall, and explosives to destroy buildings in the city to facilitate moving between buildings. Artillery support was to be provided.

The large bombs failed to breach the wall. The attack on the New Gate was successful, and the Irgunists entered the old city.

New Gate from the south (shops to the right)

However, the order to retreat was given, due to problems between the three military commands in Jerusalem - the Irgun and Stern groups were under the Haganah (Israeli army) but they still acted independently, and did not get along with the Israeli commander.

Ramparts near New Gate

Other possible scenarios could involve attacks by enemies of the Ottoman Turks, from 1540 on. For a more modern possibility, consider Napoleon. Britain could also have attacked the city in 1917/18.