Help support TMP


Exploring Mississippi Battlefields


Back to REPORT FROM BAYOU WARS 2006

Back to PROFILES



Revision Log
22 June 2006page first published

2,022 hits since 22 Jun 2006
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Personal logo reeves lk Supporting Member of TMP has printed out a tour map from a state website, so now we go in search of the Battle of Champion Hill.

Coker House

Unfortunately, not all of the battle-related sites are accessible. Over a fence and between the trees, we get a glimpse of what we believe to be Coker House (#7 on the tour map) - used as a hospital by Federal forces, now in ruins.

Tilghman memorial

Further down the road, we find the marker (map #6) where CSA Brigadier General Lloyd Tilghman was killed during the close of the battle.

Tilghman inscription
General Tilghman went to the north side of the road, probably not more than one hundred feet from the gun that stood first on the north of the road, and first to the left of my gun. I saw him when he fell mortally wounded by a shot from one of the enemy's guns, immediately after he had sighted the said gun of my battery that stood first north of the road and first at the left of my gun.

Next on the tour map (#5) is Hiawatha, another plantation home that was used as a hospital during the battle. However, we're unable to locate it. (And now I know why... a footnote on the historical website mentions that the home has been relocated for restoration!)

Baker's Creek

Here we are at the site of the Baker's Creek bridge (#4 on the map) on the Raymond-Edwards road.

Map locations 1, 2 and 3 prove quite elusive (then again, I wasn't used to the heat, and hadn't had much sleep the night before...). Then suddenly, a glimpse of something among the trees - it's the tombstone we're looking for!

Larry checks out the tombstones

Personal logo reeves lk Supporting Member of TMP charges into the woods (while I bravely fend off a stray dog that's come wandering along!). We've found the Roberts family cemetery.

Post-battle tombstone

While some of the tombstones date from after the battle (above), others were here during the Civil War (below).

Earlier tombstone, lying in fragments

As you may have gathered from the photos, the battlefield is now heavily overgrown with trees, and much of it is on private ground and not open to the public. Map site #2 is the sunken road - we find a sunken area off the road, but we're not sure if it's the right place. As darkness begins to fall, we finally give up on locating site #1 (a memorial to the battle).

BackNext