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POLL: Favorite Moment in Napoleonic Warfare?


103 votes were cast.


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Gwydion writes:

Davout at Auerstadt


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VOTING RESULTS
AnswerVotes%Chart
Another Lepic Moment
3
3%
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General Leith at Salamanca
1
1%
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Old Guard at Plancenoit
6
6%
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Lannes at Ratisbon
5
5%
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Agustina de Aragón at Zaragoza
0
0%
 
Bennigsen at Eylau
4
4%
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Old Guard at Essling
2
2%
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Ney, the Retreat, December 14th
11
11%
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Lannes and Murat at the bridge
6
6%
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no opinion
17
17%
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Colonel William Inglis at Albuera
9
9%
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The 42nd and 28th at Alexandria
2
2%
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other
8
8%
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Louis Lepic at Eylau
9
9%
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Nelson at Copenhagen
10
10%
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Napoleon on the Road to Grenoble 1815
10
10%
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POLL IS CLOSED
POLL DESCRIPTION

Question by Personal logo Flashman14 Supporting Member of TMP.

Poll set up by Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian, based on this pre-poll discussion.

Another Lepic Moment
Elsewhere Colonel Lepic's horse grenadiers were also in a tight spot, overextended and mounted on blown horses. Russian infantry began to move in, and a Russian officer called out to Lepic to surrender. 'Take a look at the faces of these men,' Lepic roared back: 'Do they look like men who would surrender?'
General Leith at Salamanca
Salamanca 22nd July 1812. General Leith. Commander 5th Division. "General Leith rode up about 2 o'clock. The cannonading at this time was terrible. Addressing the Regiment he says, ''Royals'', on which we all spang up. ''Lie down men'' said he, though he sat on horse-back, exposed to the fire as calm as possible. ''This shall be a glorious day for Old England, if these braggadocian rascals dare but stand their ground, we will display the point of the British bayonet, and where it is properly displayed no power is able to withstand it. All I request of you is to be steady and obey your officers. Stand up men!"
Old Guard at Plancenoit
The two-battalion Old Guard infantry assault against Plancenoit after the Young Guard was ejected by the Prussians and retaking the village, defeating 14 Prussian battalions in the process.
Lannes at Ratisbon
At the storming of Ratisbon, Lannes won great notoriety for his actions. The Austrians' fire was devastating as they struck down one French column after another. Resolute, Lannes ordered a third assault, which the soldiers obeyed reluctantly. Instantly, Lannes exclaimed, "Well, I will let you see that I was a genadier before I was a Marshal, and still am one." Seizing a ladder, he carried it toward the breach. His aides tried to stop him, but he was defiant. At last, Lannes's aide-de-camp, Marbot, cried, "Monsieur le Maréchal, you would not wish us to be disgraced, and that we should be if you were to receive the slightest wound in carrying that ladder to the ramparts as long as one of your aides-de-camp was left alive."

Marbot and another officer dragged the ladder away from their protesting leader. The sight of a marshal arguing with his aides over leading the assault had achieved the desired effect; the whole division was roused to action. Armed with ladders, they charged the ramparts, with Marbot the first one over the wall. Lannes soon rushed the gate with infantry, storming through the Austrian defenders.
Agustina de Aragón at Zaragoza
Agustina de Aragón at Zaragoza, stopping the French with a whiff of grapeshot from a 12pdr, whose crew had been wounded or killed, at one of the city entrances, El Portillo.
Bennigsen at Eylau
There is a moment during the battle of Eylau in 1807 when Bennigsen is in a discussion, under fire, with his HQ and Russian officers around him, about where to make a stand with some reserves as the French pressure mounts. Shot and shell and bullets are whistling around and men are falling under the storm of fire. You can just picture it, dramatic scene, blood, fire, shell bursts, terror in the middle of a raging blizzard. One officer shouts that " …. only the Devil would stand here …. " to which Bennigsen replies " …. very well then , let us stand here with the Devil …. " Whatever might be thought of his generalship, Bennigsen did not lack for personal courage.
Old Guard at Essling
The Old guard is in formation at Essling. One of the men have to take a cr.p. He goes out in front and turns his back on the enemy while doing his business in front of the whole regiment – the Austrians gunners shower him with cannonballs without hitting him and he returns to the regiment to applause. His reason was, that the guard could never retreat in front of the enemy.
Ney, the Retreat, December 14th
At dawn on December 14, the Russians attacked. Ney called upon his infantry, but only one of its weak battalions, the garrison of 300 Germans, was armed. When a Russian cannonball came crashing over the stockade, killing their commanding officer, the soldiers threw down their arms and fled in terror. Still, Ney, deserted by the last of the organized armed units, refused to surrender his position. After a vain attempt to check the flight of the Germans, he gathered up their loaded muskets and faced the horde of Russians alone. Sergeant Bourgogne wrote: "I shall never forget the Marshal's commanding air at this moment, his splendid attitude towards the enemy, and the confidence with which he inspired the unhappy, sick and wounded around him. In this moment he was like one of the heroes of old time. In these last days of this disastrous retreat he was the savior of the remnant of the Army.
Lannes and Murat at the bridge
My favourite moment is when Lannes and Murat captured the bridge across the Danube at Spitz by persuading the Austrian commander that an armistice had already been signed. And when he asked why a party of grenadiers led by Oudinot was advancing on the bridge they managed to persuade him that they weren't advancing they were just marking time to keep their feet warm in the cold weather.
no opinion
None of these/no opinion
Colonel William Inglis at Albuera
Colonel William Inglis at Albuera: "Die hard 57th, die hard.'
The 42nd and 28th at Alexandria
In the dawn's grey light, fighting French dragoons in front and rear. "Abercrombie calling out "My brave Highlanders, remember your forefathers!" The 28th, running out of ammunition at the end and chucking stones at French infantry on the glacis, who have also run out of ammunition and are chucking stones st them. To their left, Highlanders, collapse on the sand in the morning sun and weep helplessly amidst their dead and wounded, when the massed enemy have finally withdrawn and the cannon balls are no longer ploughing through their ranks. Abercromby finally acknowledges he has been wounded and allows his staff to carry him to the rear. "The reserve, against whom the principal attack of the enemy was directed, conducted themselves with unexampled spirit. They resisted the impetuosity of the French infantry, and repulsed several charges of cavalry… The 28th and 42nd regiments acted in the most distinguished and brilliant manner."
other
Please explain.
Louis Lepic at Eylau
At the battle of Eylau, seeing his horse grenadiers lowering their heads as bullets whistled around, Lepic had this famous word: "Heads up gentlemen, these are bullets, not Bleeped text!" (Haut la tête messieurs, la mitraille ce n'est pas de la merde !). The ensuing heroic charge at the head of his horse grenadiers, where he was seriously wounded, brought him the rank of général de brigade. Seeing Lepic after the battle, Napoleon went to him and said: "I thought you had been captured, General Lepic. I was feeling deeply sorrowful about it," at which Lepic retorted: "Sire, you will only ever hear of my death." That evening, Lepic, who had been seriously wounded in action that day, received 50,000 francs, which he immediately distributed to his horse grenadiers
Nelson at Copenhagen
Nelson turning his (literally) blind eye to his commander's signals at Copenhagen,
Napoleon on the Road to Grenoble 1815
Napoleon facing down the 5th of Line on the road to Grenoble in 1815.