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POLL: Holistic Approach to 40K Point Values?


349 votes were cast.


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unknown member writes:

I think it is true that the GW team's mentality isn't right. Your objective, as a tester, is to deliberately break the rules. You're not there to play the game and have fun -- you're there to cheese your army as horribly as you can.

Now, as to whether better playtesting could save 40K ... I don't think so. While I've already mentioned why I think free builds are a bad idea, I should mention that GW doesn't necessarily have a free build -- they do require a force organization. Where they ultimately fall down is that they don't properly balance the different parts of the force org. My thinking is that every Troop type should fall into that narrow band of capabilities that I mentioned before -- and the problem is that 40K doesn't enforce that.


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VOTING RESULTS
AnswerVotes%Chart
definitely the right way to do it
12
3%
bar of chart
it's a good way to determine values
102
29%
bar of chart
I'm ambivalent
56
16%
bar of chart
seems like a poor way to go about it
92
26%
bar of chart
definitely the wrong process to use
36
10%
bar of chart
I don't play 40K
45
13%
bar of chart
no opinion
6
2%
bar of chart
POLL IS CLOSED
POLL DESCRIPTION

Writing in White Dwarf 297, Andy Hoare explains how the Warhammer 40,000 designers use a "holistic approach" to determine point values:

Point values in Warhammer 40,000 are not generated with any kind of formula. Instead, point values are created by comparing existing unit points and abilities...

Thus, when a new unit is created, it has a points value assigned to it; and it is tested by playing some games. The unit's value and/or rules are adjusted, and then it is tried again (and again). Next, the unit is handed over to playtesters who play lots more games with it, and the unit is adjusted even more. Eventually, a value is reached that most people are happy with (it's rare for everyone to agree completely) and the rules for the unit are published.

Does this Guess-Fight-Adjust method sound right to you?