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POLL: Works In Process Painting Technique


100 votes were cast.


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Syrinx0 writes:

I do only when I have issues with motivation while painting units. Generally it's not planned.


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354 hits since 13 May 2018
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VOTING RESULTS
AnswerVotes%Chart
other (explain)
4
4%
bar of chart
no, I do not follow this approach
35
35%
bar of chart
not a painter
1
1%
bar of chart
yes, I follow this approach
57
57%
bar of chart
I do not follow this approach any more
3
3%
bar of chart
POLL IS CLOSED
POLL DESCRIPTION

Personal logo Sgt Slag Supporting Member of TMP writes:

There was an article published within The Dragon magazine, back in the late 1970s, about a painting technique the author called, Works in Process. With this technique, the author shared how he works on whatever he feels like, at any given time. He has many groups of figures in various stages of completion. He simply works on whatever strikes his fancy, when he has time to paint.

I use this approach, along with assembly-line style of painting. Combined, I find the two techniques allow me to finish large batches of figures at the same time (about to finish a 112-figure Goblin army, ten Frost Giants, ten goats, 14 chickens, and a wooden palisade fortress – all are nearly ready for The Dip, followed by a matte coat). [The goats will be used to mark Shaken units, while the chickens will be used to mark Routing units…] I have many, many more figures at various stages of completion (Lizard Men, zombie humans, and dogs, an Elven Army, armored War Dogs, Fire Giants, and the list goes on…).

So, how many of you follow the Works In Process approach to painting? Cheers!

Poll set up by Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian, based on this previous poll.