Help support TMP


POLL: Can You Field the U.S. Marines in the Great War?


191 votes were cast.


Back to POLLS home page


quidveritas Inactive Member writes:

At various points in time the Marines had zero to 8 day bomber squadrons. They were supposed to be equipped with Liberty DH-9's. My soon to be published book, 'Yanks!' gets into this a little.

Speaking off the cuff today, IIRC the USMC only received 6-7 Liberty DH-4's. What they did receive were a number of Liberty Engines. They traded these to the Brits for DH9a's (3 engines for every DH9a). In this manner they acquired 53 DH9a's for the Navy. AFAIK, only about 20 of these DH9a's actually flew in combat for the Marines.

So . . . while the USMC probably had enough men and pilots for 6 squadrons, they probably never flew more than 30 aircraft in combat. Given the fact that these squadrons were supposed to have 18 aircraft . . . well you do the math.

I have yet to find anything that would indicate these aircraft were all bunched into two units or spread out over 6 (or something in between). They all flew out of the same area. Maintenance issues would have kept at least 15% of these on the ground on any given day. So I suspect the squadron designations were probably moot.

For what it's worth there were no squadron markings on the aircraft themselves. They were marked with the USMC emblem. That's it.

mjc


Back to the Homepage



1,544 hits since 12 Apr 2009
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

If you were a member of this website, you could participate in website polls. Would you like a free membership?

VOTING RESULTS
AnswerVotes%Chart
yes
22
12%
bar of chart
no
100
52%
bar of chart
not interested in Americans
18
9%
bar of chart
not interested in the Western Front
3
2%
bar of chart
not interested in WWI
48
25%
bar of chart
not a gamer
0
0%
 
POLL IS CLOSED
POLL DESCRIPTION

The April issue of Naval History magazine profiles Louis Cukela, the ethnic Serbian Leatherneck who earned the Medal of Honor on WWI's Western Front:

Just as a friendly barrage of artillery lifted early on 18 July, murderous machine-gun fire tore into the ranks of the Leathernecks deployed in the Foret de Retz. Cukela struck out alone in front of his platoon, ignoring warnings from his comrades. Advancing from the flank, he used his bayonet to wipe out the crew of one machine-gun emplacement. Then, Cukela threw captured grenades to drive terrified Germans from a second strongpoint. Singlehandedly, he captured four Germans and two machine-gun nests.

Do you have the painted figures that would allow you to field U.S. Marines in the Great War?