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POLL: Favorite Quote From Shakespeare (Round 1)


302 votes were cast by total voters.


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Personal logo Florida Tory Supporting Member of TMP writes:

Other: Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 7

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
It were done quickly

And the passage that vtsaogames cited.

Rick


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681 hits since 18 Nov 2016
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
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VOTING RESULTS
AnswerVotes%Chart
Richard II, Act 1, Scene 1
9
3%
bar of chart
Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 3
3
1%
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Lear, Act 4, Scene 1
4
1%
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Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2
1
0%
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Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 5
3
1%
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Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 5
17
6%
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Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3
43
14%
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Henry V, Act 3, Scene 1
24
8%
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Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 1
14
5%
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Henry V, Act 1, Prologue
9
3%
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The Tempest, Act 5, Scene 1
2
1%
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Macbeth, Act 3, Scene 2
2
1%
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Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1
10
3%
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Sonnet 18
6
2%
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The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2
4
1%
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Hamlet, Act 4, Scene 7
1
0%
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Henry VI, Part 2, Act 4, Scene 2
17
6%
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A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 3, Scene 2
13
4%
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Julius Caesar, Act 4, Scene 3
8
3%
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Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 4
4
1%
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Richard III, Act 1, Scene 1
14
5%
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Winter's Tale, Act 3, Scene 3
2
1%
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Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3
10
3%
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Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2
1
0%
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Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 1
5
2%
bar of chart
As You Like it, Act 2, Scene 7
7
2%
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Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 1
4
1%
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Julius Caesar, Act 1, Scene 2
9
3%
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Richard III, Act 5, Scene 4
9
3%
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Julius Caesar, Act 1, Scene 2
16
5%
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The Merchant of Venice, Act 4, Scene 1
4
1%
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other
12
4%
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none of these
15
5%
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POLL IS CLOSED
POLL DESCRIPTION

Gennorm says:

Happy St George's Day! What's your favourite quote from The Bard?

Poll set up by Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian, based on this pre-poll discussion.

Richard II, Act 1, Scene 1
This royal throne of kings, this scepter'd isle,
This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
This other Eden, demi-paradise,
This fortress built by Nature for herself
Against infection and the hand of war,
This happy breed of men, this little world,
This precious stone set in the silver sea,
Which serves it in the office of a wall,
Or as a moat defensive to a house,
Against the envy of less happier lands,
This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England…
Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 3
The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
In deepest consequence.—
Lear, Act 4, Scene 1
As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods.
They kill us for their sport.
Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2
Hamlet: To me [Denmark] is a prison.

Rosencrantz: Why then your ambition makes it one. 'Tis too narrow for your mind.

Hamlet: O God, I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space—were it not that I have bad dreams.

Guildenstern: Which dreams indeed are ambition, for the very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.
Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 5
CAPULET
God's bread! it makes me mad! Day, night, work, play,
Alone, in company, still my care hath been
To have her match'd, and having now provided
A gentleman of noble parentage,
Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly lien'd,
Stuff'd, as they say, with honourable parts,
Proportion'd as one's thought would wish a man;
And then to have a wretched puling fool,
A whining mammet, in her fortune's tender,
To answer "I'll not wed; I cannot love,
I am too young; I pray you, pardon me."
But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise.
An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in the streets,
For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn.
Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 5
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3
That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart; his passport shall be made
And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
We would not die in that man's company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
Henry V, Act 3, Scene 1
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead.
In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility:
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage;
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let pry through the portage of the head
Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it
As fearfully as doth a galled rock
O'erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean.
Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide,
Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit
To his full height. On, on, you noblest English.
Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!
Fathers that, like so many Alexanders,
Have in these parts from morn till even fought
And sheathed their swords for lack of argument:
Dishonour not your mothers; now attest
That those whom you call'd fathers did beget you.
Be copy now to men of grosser blood,
And teach them how to war. And you, good yeoman,
Whose limbs were made in England, show us here
The mettle of your pasture; let us swear
That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not;
For there is none of you so mean and base,
That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot:
Follow your spirit, and upon this charge
Cry 'God for Harry, England, and Saint George!'
Julius Caesar, Act 3, Scene 1
And Caesar's spirit, raging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war,
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.
Henry V, Act 1, Prologue
O! for a Muse of fire, that would ascend
The brightest heaven of invention!
A kingdom for a stage, princes to act
And monarchs to behold the swelling scene
The Tempest, Act 5, Scene 1
Miranda:
O wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world
That has such people in't!

Prospero:
'Tis new to thee.
Macbeth, Act 3, Scene 2
Oh, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife!
Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1
To sleep - perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub
Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2
You taught me language, and my profit on 't
Is I know how to curse.
Hamlet, Act 4, Scene 7
LAERTES I will do't:
And, for that purpose, I'll anoint my sword.
I bought an unction of a mountebank,
So mortal that, but dip a knife in it,
Where it draws blood no cataplasm so rare,
Collected from all simples that have virtue
Under the moon, can save the thing from death
That is but scratch'd withal: I'll touch my point
With this contagion, that, if I gall him slightly,
It may be death.
Henry VI, Part 2, Act 4, Scene 2
The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 3, Scene 2
Lord, what fools these mortals be!
Julius Caesar, Act 4, Scene 3
There is a tide in the affairs of men.
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 4
Something is rotten in the state of Denmark
Richard III, Act 1, Scene 1
Now is the winter of our discontent made glorious summer by this sun of York.
Winter's Tale, Act 3, Scene 3
Exit, pursued by a bear
Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3
This above all – to thine own self be true.
Hamlet, Act 2, Scene 2
Then came each actor on his ass
Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 1
'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twil serve.
As You Like it, Act 2, Scene 7
All the world's a stage and we are merely players.
Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 1
Out, damned spot!
Julius Caesar, Act 1, Scene 2
Let me have men about me that are fat,
Sleek-headed men and such as sleep a-nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look,
He thinks too much; such men are dangerous.
Richard III, Act 5, Scene 4
King Richard: A horse, a horse! My kingdom for a horse!

Catesby: Withdraw, my lord; I'll help you to a horse.

King Richard: Slave! I have set my life upon a cast,
And I will stand the hazard of the die.
Julius Caesar, Act 1, Scene 2
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves.
The Merchant of Venice, Act 4, Scene 1
The quality of mercy is not strained
other
Please explain
none of these
None of these are my favorites.