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"Did he make "the smart play"?" Topic


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392 hits since 17 Mar 2015
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
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Personal logo Saginaw Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2015 6:54 p.m. PST

link

There can be arguments made for and against this particular player's decision, but one has to consider the fates of other former pro football players who have suffered long-term brain trauma from years of high-impact contact, most notably San Diego Charger Junior Seau. We also have to take into account, of course, the fact that these athletes chose to play with the associated risks that come with it.

Should the NFL take note of this? Should they worry about future players making the same decision? Will this change the league in any way?

Personal logo UltraOrk Supporting Member of TMP18 Mar 2015 8:18 p.m. PST

Give me enough money on the front end, I'll only play a game or two & I'm done.

Ed Mohrmann Supporting Member of TMP19 Mar 2015 6:06 a.m. PST

If head contact is an issue, and it is, then all sports
with contact involved have to sit up and take notice.

Personal logo Parzival Supporting Member of TMP19 Mar 2015 6:21 a.m. PST

I think it comes down to life goals. He clearly has other dreams for himself and his life, and the risk of concussion is a danger to those dreams, or at least not worth the temporary departure that is pro ball. For others, the game is the dream; they want the rings and the trophies and the fans and the place in the record books, and thus the risk is worth the goal in their estimation. I suspect it will always be like that, so I don't think the NFL is in danger from that aspect.

I do think that football at all levels needs to make a rapid change to better equipment and techniques to reduce the risk of injury. I suspect that soft-sided helmets or helmets with some sort of individual shifting or compression plates might aid greatly. At the very least they need to get back to old school effective tackling (wrap 'em up, bring 'em down) over impact speed (which most times doesn't work well anyway).

But this isn't the End of Football. That's just headline hype.

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP19 Mar 2015 7:14 a.m. PST

For him, yes. Others will make their own choices.

If I were Elway (easy for me to ask this since I'm not) competitive urge notwithstanding, is the injury with which you are playing and the danger it presents REALLY worth risking for another shot at another ring? You have a lot of life to still live – you don't want to be Chris Reeves replacement as the poster child for damaged spines.

JJ

Smokey Roan Inactive Member19 Mar 2015 9:38 a.m. PST

Lots of higher risk jobs for a fraction of the pay.

Personal logo Saginaw Supporting Member of TMP19 Mar 2015 11:24 a.m. PST

I do think that football at all levels needs to make a rapid change to better equipment and techniques to reduce the risk of injury.

If those that are in charge eventually decide to do that, it would probably be the most significant change to the sport since President Theodore Roosevelt's efforts to help reform the game approximately 110 years ago. More about that can be read from the link below:

link

You have a lot of life to still live you don't want to be Chris Reeves replacement as the poster child for damaged spines.

As soon as you posted this, Terrement/JJ, the late Darryl Stingley of the New England Patriots immediately came to mind, who became the proverbial "poster child" of on-the-field permanent injuries for many, many years. Since that time, the NFL has enacted rules and penalties to try and protect defenseless players from head trauma that could result in a debilitating or paralyzing injury. Notice I said "try", since it seems as though the technology has yet to arrive on how to best protect one's head on the gridiron.

Sure is a LOT to chew on, here.

Tom Bryant Inactive Member19 Mar 2015 4:41 p.m. PST

The question is: what did he want to do with his life? I suspect that football was not "his life" the way it is for some. I.E. The money, fame, women, etc. It sounds like he had a bigger plan all along and maybe realized that now was the time. I do not fault him for his call. How many kids starting out in Junior High football get that far? I cannot nor will not fault him for his call.

Smokey Roan Inactive Member19 Mar 2015 4:43 p.m. PST

I'm guessing he will make millions in a public sector job.


Seriously.

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