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"you guys that thought ebola would not loose in the US." Topic


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591 hits since 15 Oct 2014
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Ron W DuBray15 Oct 2014 9:39 a.m. PST

link

so how many more cases do you think will be found in the next 30 days??

Only Warlock15 Oct 2014 10:07 a.m. PST

Read an analysis by an RN this morning that I found very sobering. When they mean Ebola is not transmitted via airborne vectors they mean like smallpox where it can free float for a long time.

Ebola IS transmissible EXACTLY like the flu. Short range droplet through the air (same room effectively) and manual transfer onto surfaces and direct contact.

Think about the waves of flu that sweep across the US every year

Streitax Inactive Member15 Oct 2014 10:53 a.m. PST

Nope, nothing to see here. Move along, move..hack..ack..arrrrrrghhhh. No, it's not funny. All those greasy assurances about how WE know how to deal with it and WE can contain it. Well, that knowledge isn't getting to the people who have to deal with it. But, it's only a few people who will die, nothing to worry about.

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP15 Oct 2014 11:09 a.m. PST

Yeah.

I remember the facebook cartoon that mocked people who didn't believe in global warming but did believe there was a threat from ebola, despite what the scientists told us.

I remember the DC folks saying it was no problem and that protocols were in place – total lie. Lack of equipment, lack of procedures, lack of training. All thickly frosted with a total lack of honesty.

I'm tired of the crap being shoveled, ever changing, with no reason to believe any of the assurances.

And, even though not as serious in terms of a percentage chance of death if caught, I still fail to understand the logic and willingness to have multitudes of non-health screened folks being distributed around the country, where they become untracable. That "mystery disease" that has hit the midwest? How common is it in central America?

RavenscraftCybernetics Inactive Member15 Oct 2014 12:05 p.m. PST

lets quaranteen Texas now!

Bangorstu15 Oct 2014 12:26 p.m. PST

All of two cases from people with direct exposure to an Ebola patient.

Frankly, I'd be more worried right now about the lack of expertise being shown by your hospitals.

For a start, why does looking after one guy need over 70 people to have direct exposure to him?

Just to reiterate something I said before – it's entirely unknown in Central america.

Ron W DuBray15 Oct 2014 12:49 p.m. PST

how many people had exposure to the two health workers that have it before they were contained?

Streitax Inactive Member15 Oct 2014 12:54 p.m. PST

Central America is one airline passenger away from a disaster. I agree about the lack of expertise, the point is, the government and those on this forum who derided those concerned assured us there was nothing to worry about. It was well understood. We had everything we needed to control it, etc., etc. Like any machine, it looks good on the drawing board, but when you put the parts together and try to make it run you find out the problems. Unfortunately a nurse in Texas and a nurse in Spain are evidence of the flaws in the protocols. No plan survives contact with the enemy. Which is why you don't invite the enemy into your home.

enfant perdus15 Oct 2014 12:58 p.m. PST

Just to reiterate something I said before it's entirely unknown in Central america.

He's talking about a different "epidemic", Enterovirus D68. Which, I believe, has also not been reported in Central America.

Streitax Inactive Member15 Oct 2014 12:59 p.m. PST

OK, thanks for the clarification.

enfant perdus15 Oct 2014 1:00 p.m. PST

Central America is one airline passenger away from a disaster.

Very true. One could add much of Asia as well.

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP15 Oct 2014 1:06 p.m. PST

Frankly, I'd be more worried right now about the lack of expertise being shown by your hospitals.

Yep. And how many other non-third world hospitals are equally untrained, unequipped and unprepared?

All of two cases from people with direct exposure to an Ebola patient.

So far. Given the ever changing "ground truth" on how infectious it is, how persistent it is and how it can or cannot be spread, we don't know how many of the other passengers on the planes, or in the airports or on the plane after the nurse left it or…

Bottom line is we don't know a lot more than we do know. If she wasn't infectious on the flights, then cool beans. OTOH, if she was infectious but just not yet showing the severe symptoms, it may be spread all over the place, and just not yet blossoming.

For a start, why does looking after one guy need over 70 people to have direct exposure to him?

I don't think he did. I think there were 70 people exposed to his fluids indirectly not in caring for him but by being in the same location but for other reasons before he was identified and went into isolation. Could be wrong though.

JJ

enfant perdus15 Oct 2014 1:18 p.m. PST

I'm not sure Streitax and I were thinking in the same direction. What I thought he meant was, if one infected person arrives in Central America, then Katy bar the door, which is why I added Asia. Consider the ramifications of a Mr.Duncan landing in Mumbai, or Jakarta, or Manila, or Dhaka, or…

Ed Mohrmann Supporting Member of TMP15 Oct 2014 1:55 p.m. PST

IDK from transmittable. I do know my wife, the nurse.
We are laying in supplies for a 60 day period, including
firewood, drinking water and food.

Push comes to shove, we will self-isolate – she claims
that, CDC to the contrary, there COULD (note, not WILL)
be a serious outbreak here in the US

BW195915 Oct 2014 2:07 p.m. PST

link

The second health care worker with ebola just travelled to Ohio and had contact with workers at Kent State University where my daughter is a student.

gladue15 Oct 2014 2:07 p.m. PST

Sigh. Bird flu. SARS. How many groundless panics do we need before people learn to calm down? I mean, sure we should nuke Texas from orbit, but it's not because of Ebola!

Terrement Supporting Member of TMP15 Oct 2014 2:27 p.m. PST

I think there is a difference between panic (which we are NOT seeing) and a real concern, especially given the lack of preparedness and the lack of honesty to this point.

I think panic would be evidenced by massive amounts of mindless shopping (like is done before a hurricane is predicted to hit), incessant pressuring of elected officials for much more action than is being taken, or even being considered at this point, news organizations not just raising concerns but actually stoking the flames (see Rev Sharpton and Jackson in Ferguson for examples) to incite more unrest, massive self imposed isolation (kids home from school, folks taking off from work), nearly empty public transportation, etc.

Now, if there is any indication of someone being diagnosed from being exposed by the nurse before she realized she had the symptoms, that will be a different story. If more than one…

JJ

kidbananas15 Oct 2014 5:05 p.m. PST

I wonder if it is possible to detect the virus before one becomes contagious. The Kent State article linked to by BW1959 says they know of 3 employees that came into contact with the nurse. If they could test for the disease before they become contagious then there would be a lot less anxiety. The same with Dallas and other areas.

Charlie 1215 Oct 2014 7:54 p.m. PST

Hard to test before contagious state due to the low level of viral load. Can be done, but its butt ugly difficult with a lot of false results.

goragrad15 Oct 2014 8:23 p.m. PST

Just quarantine those who have a credible exposure.

22 days no infection, turn them loose.

Simple, straightforward.

Bangorstu16 Oct 2014 2:02 a.m. PST

While it's fun to portray third world nations as incompetant note there was an outbreak of Ebola in Congo this year that was contained quickly. Nigeria managed to contain the problrm also and these are countries with health systems much worse than the poorest Central American nation.

Now…how is Ebola going to get to Central America? Only possible vector is US incompetance given the lack of a huge West African community in the area.

Your diet, alcohol and tobacco consumption and gun laws are all vastly mote dangerous to your health.

stenicplus Inactive Member16 Oct 2014 5:18 a.m. PST

Hold that thought, I'll just run and get some popcorn…

Tony58 Inactive Member18 Oct 2014 1:44 p.m. PST

Erik Rush: 'Diabolical' Obama May 'Want Ebola To Spread In The United States' – See more at: link

link

Is this a conspiracy theory to far?

Personal logo Bowman Supporting Member of TMP27 Feb 2015 4:56 p.m. PST

"you guys that thought ebola would not loose in the US."

Total cases in the US 10
Cases contracted in the US 2
Total deaths 2
Total active cases since Dec. 2014 0

So how is the Pandemic coming along?

how many people had exposure to the two health workers that have it before they were contained?

0

All those greasy assurances about how WE know how to deal with it and WE can contain it.

Apparently they did.

Personal logo Bowman Supporting Member of TMP27 Feb 2015 5:11 p.m. PST

When they mean Ebola is not transmitted via airborne vectors they mean like smallpox where it can free float for a long time.

No. When they say airborne vector they mean a carrier that flies thru the air. West Nile disease has birds as an airborne vector. Smallpox is not airborne and humans are the vector. You need prolonged exposure to an infected individual, or his clothing to contract smallpox.

Ebola IS transmissible EXACTLY like the flu. Short range droplet through the air (same room effectively) and manual transfer onto surfaces and direct contact.

Transmissibility is only one factor in a micro organisms virulence. As infectious diseases go, Influenza is still the number one killer of human beings, by a wide margin.

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