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"Oldest evidence of horseback riding in China" Topic


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262 hits since 30 Nov 2020
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP30 Nov 2020 3:17 p.m. PST

"Researchers have discovered the oldest direct evidence of mounted horseback riding in China. Horse burials have shown that the nomadic peoples of the Eurasian Steppes were riding domesticated horses at least as far back as the 18th century B.C., but there has been no equivalent hard archaeological data found in China to indicate when horseback riding was adopted. Analysis of ancient horse bones discovered in Shirenzigou and Xigou in Xinjiang, northwest China, has now revealed that people in the area were riding horses by 350 B.C., predating the Silk Road trade through the region.

The skeletons of eight horses from the Late Warring States period were unearthed in nearly complete condition, which made a thorough osteological examination possible. With entire bodies to examine, researchers were able to establish patterns of stress typical of horseback riding seen at other archaeological sites and in modern veterinary practice…"

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