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"Polish Lancer without Horse." Topic


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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP24 Mar 2020 1:20 p.m. PST

Beautifull Polish …Lancer… (smile)

link


Amicalement
Armand

Robert le Diable24 Mar 2020 3:33 p.m. PST

A lancer without a horse is a pikeman!

(Yes, I did look at the pin-up, but who has ever heard of a "spear-woman"?)

Raynman Supporting Member of TMP24 Mar 2020 8:53 p.m. PST

Pike person!

Stoppage25 Mar 2020 5:17 a.m. PST

@armand

Have you heard of Rick-Rolling?

Wiki

Robert le Diable25 Mar 2020 8:11 a.m. PST

@Stoppage, don't know about Armand, but this is the first time that I've encountered the term. What isn't clear, to me at least, is why you added this information (or is it just a joke, rather than a specific relevance I'm overlooking?). I gotta know, man!

Marc at work25 Mar 2020 8:23 a.m. PST

The link didn't take me to the lancer, but to the makers/illustrator's FB page.

So sort of Rick Rolling – although as I have a lot of time for the Armand and the good stuff he finds, I guess "I'm never going to give him up"…

Marc at work25 Mar 2020 8:27 a.m. PST

And yet, by PC, it worked. Go figure. Mind you, I like the one with the pig in her hat

Stoppage25 Mar 2020 9:57 a.m. PST

@devilbert:

In the old days you'd send the Rick Astley link to someone at work and then – over the speakers – really loud – you'd get "Never Gonna Give You Up" (Hilarious and never got old! LOL)

Armand's version is Bartek's "illustrations". Some of which aren't really safe for work. (And now not safe for working-from-home either).

Just sayin'

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP25 Mar 2020 11:51 a.m. PST

(smile)

Amicalement
Armand

Robert le Diable25 Mar 2020 12:37 p.m. PST

I see, Stoppage. I also saw all the "cover pictures". There are Highlanders there! And he seems to think the United Irishmen had a Grenadier Company. Good fun really, and the uniforms seem fairly accurate right down to the ubiquitous high heels, though they all seem a bit too short….

With regard to what can happen at work when irresponsible people get inventive with technology, I'll add an amusing, but quite lengthy, story below (so anyone can skip over it, just as lightly as any of Bartek's fantasies).

R le D ( "devilbert"! Hah!)

Robert le Diable25 Mar 2020 1:11 p.m. PST

All right, anecdote from nearly thirty-five or forty years ago. Once upon a time, employees with too much time on their idle hands would leave a short, handwritten note for a colleague who happened to be out of the office or whatever. The note stated that someone had called them on the telephone during their absence. Not unusually, there was a telephone number on the note with the request that the caller should be called back. So far so good. When the number was contacted, after a few rings/buzzes the caller was connected to an Answering Machine. For those familiar now only with Voicemail and the like, an Answering Machine consisted of a modified Tape Recorder connected to a telephone. One Cassette Tape played a short message if no-one answered the telephone before a set time/number of rings had passed; "Sorry there's no-one here to take your call….". A second Cassette Tape allowed the caller to leave a message, in the expectation that he would then be contacted when someone returned, and heard the message. A useful invention.

But, to our tale. The device could obviously be modified, and perverted from its intended purpose. When, in the office scenario mentioned above, the short, handwritten message was received, and the return call made, after a couple of rings/buzzes the caller found himself connected to an Answering Machine (one trademark was "Ansafone", so no wonder children can't spel anny morr). This message was absolutely unexceptional, a simple "We're sorry no-one is available to take your ca----", which was then interrupted by the slight clatter/rattle made when the receiver is lifted we're talking Landlines here, remember and another voice said, "Hello, just didn't reach the phone in time, Hello…?" The caller would then begin, saying that he had been called earlier, etc. The other person seemed to be listening, for all of ten/fifteen seconds, and then he would say that he couldn't hear properly, could the caller speak up a bit? So the caller spoke louder. He would soon be asked to speak louder, because he still couldn't be heard. So the caller spoke even louder. Then there came a touch of genius. The pre-recorded message he was getting, for that was what it was, the pauses nicely judged, continued, "Wait a minute, I still can't 'ear ya, I'll get me 'earing aid". There was the sound of a receiver being placed on a table, and slow, shuffling, elderly footsteps fading away. About two minutes later, they could be heard returning. The receiver was lifted. The "old timer" spoke again, "Aw right, I got me 'earing aid, wot ya sayin'?" So the caller in the office, by now a very silent office as everyone watched for the next act, repeated the original message for the third or fourth time. On the other end, after another nicely judged, pre-recorded pause, the Old Timer said loudly, with every impression of exasperation, "Naw, I STILL can't 'ear ya!" This "prank", as it would now be called, went round offices in London like a wildfire, or a virulent virus. It soon spread rather further.

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP26 Mar 2020 10:21 p.m. PST

Ha!Ha!….

Amicalement
Armand

Robert le Diable26 Mar 2020 10:46 p.m. PST

I can't 'ear ya!

But can still read your various postings, and pictures I would not ordinarily see. Including Napoleon's compagnie of Lanceuses Polonaise, it seems.

Stoppage27 Mar 2020 4:47 a.m. PST

There was one where the "responder" said – "hold on a minute will you" and then later on said "I told you to be quiet".

I seem to recall getting quite cross and shoutie whilst office colleagues fell off chairs with tears of laughter rolling down their cheeks. LOL

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