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"Nazi Commando Otto Skorzeny Continued His Life of " Topic


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Tango0122 Dec 2018 3:58 p.m. PST

…Intrigue After the War.

"Otto Skorzeny was Nazi Germany's most notorious commando. His missions included rescuing Italian dictator Benito Mussolini from imprisonment and sending German troops in American uniforms to conduct sabotage during the Battle of the Bulge.

Hitler favored Skorzeny, though many of his colleagues disliked him. Admittedly a brave man, he joined the Nazi Party in the early 1930s and liked nothing more than self-serving adventure. These intrigues continued even after the war ended….."
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Amicalement
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robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP22 Dec 2018 7:13 p.m. PST

You know mostly "War is Boring" is better than this. Yes, the man was a Nazi. But given that he was exonerated by an Allied court, how does he get to be a "notorious" as opposed to a "famous" commando? And how were his commando missions more "self-serving" than those of, say, Stirling or Wingate? Doesn't say.

As for Skorzeny's post-WWII activities, the article pretty well boils down to "there were rumors he was doing something." If an author has no facts and won't print rumors, he should seriously consider putting the article aside and working on something he has facts about.

pzivh43 Supporting Member of TMP22 Dec 2018 8:05 p.m. PST

Too hard to do the painstaking research---just string a few speculations together with some conjecture, and voila, a starling new perspective. Sadly seems to be the state of journalism today in a lot of cases.

Legion 423 Dec 2018 11:34 a.m. PST

Yes, he was clearly a Nazi and supporter, at least. But … :

But given that he was exonerated by an Allied court, how does he get to be a "notorious" as opposed to a "famous" commando? And how were his commando missions more "self-serving" than those of, say, Stirling or Wingate? Doesn't say.
That says it all for me … he was exonerated by those he fought against.

Richard Baber24 Dec 2018 7:43 a.m. PST

In his trial several British and US officers, Commandos and Rangers testified they had worn enemy uniforms, done dubious things in the line of duty, etc.

Their testimoney went a long way to commuting his sentence from death to inprisonment……..

Legion 424 Dec 2018 7:48 a.m. PST

Yes, the very nature of special ops/commandos/raids, etc. relies very much on deception and surprise …


To paraphrase Sun Tzu, "All warfare is deception…"


Surprise is one of the Principles of War …

Mobius24 Dec 2018 8:12 a.m. PST

You know mostly "War is Boring" is better than this. Yes, the man was a Nazi. But given that he was exonerated by an Allied court, how does he get to be a "notorious" as opposed to a "famous" commando? And how were his commando missions more "self-serving" than those of, say, Stirling or Wingate? Doesn't say.

Can you imagine if a western writer said this of any Allied commander? Was Patton's race in Sicily against Montgomery self-serving?

Hornswoggler Inactive Member25 Dec 2018 3:49 a.m. PST

Their testimoney went a long way to commuting his sentence from death to inprisonment……..

This is a matter of conjecture. The court did not provide any explanation for the decision not to convict.

Previous discussion, links to transcripts, etc, etc, here:

TMP link

Fred Cartwright25 Dec 2018 4:37 a.m. PST

Was Patton's race in Sicily against Montgomery self-serving?

Yes!

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