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"Amazing photos of French Zouaves" Topic


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595 hits since 11 Jul 2018
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Cuirassier11 Jul 2018 8:09 p.m. PST

CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE THEM!

26 April, 1910… Teddy Roosevelt inspecting French Zouaves at Vincennes. Review of the garrison of Paris under the command of General Dalstein. Zouaves are marching by.

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Zouaves at the Place de la Concorde, Paris, in 1911: link

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Zouaves on parade (1911): link

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Zouaves waiting to embark (1912): link

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Zouaves participating in a military competition (1912):

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Zouaves in front of the Gare de Lyon, Paris, in 1913: link

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Zouaves marching on parade in Paris, in 1913. Drummers leading the way: link

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Review at Vincennes in 1913: link

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French Zouaves marching (1914): link

More to come.

Cuirassier11 Jul 2018 8:22 p.m. PST

Zouaves during maneuvers (September of 1909):

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Cuirassier11 Jul 2018 8:38 p.m. PST

Color guard and flag of the 3rd French Zouaves in 1904. The battle honors of the regiment are: SEBASTOPOL, KABYLIE, PALESTRO, SAN LORENZO (the regiment was awarded with the cross of the Légion d'honneur for capturing two Mexican flags/fanions at the combat of San Lorenzo in 1863) and EXTREME ORIENT.

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Personal logo Grelber Supporting Member of TMP11 Jul 2018 9:24 p.m. PST

Great photos, Cuirassier!
It looks like many of the officers are wearing standard French officers' uniforms. Officers usually have a clothing allowance, rather than being issued uniforms like the enlisted men, which sometimes leads to them not buying the fancy uniforms (like Zouaves) because they'll transferred back to the line regiments before they get much use. Was that the case in France?
I see one officer on a white horse--any special meaning to that? I think of the movie "Young Winston," where it is indication of somebody who wants to be noticed.
Great stuff!
Grelber

Ramming12 Jul 2018 5:42 a.m. PST

I think some of these 'Zouaves' are Tirailleurs Algerien, probably the ones in the white pantaloons. The Zouaves were all of European decent, the Tirailleurs were of native extraction; many in the photos look decidedly North African so they are unlikely to be Zouaves. Nice photos, hope I'm not being too picky.

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 6:39 a.m. PST

I know the differences between Zouaves and Algerian Tirailleurs. Rest assured, they are all French Zouaves.

Officers of Algerian Tirailleurs wore uniforms with totally different colors than those worn by the officers of Zouaves. Zouaves wore dark blue uniforms and Algerian Tirailleurs wore light blue uniforms (there were also some other minimal differences between the uniforms of Zouaves and Algerian Tirailleurs). Both wore white trousers on campaing and during maneuvers.

Take a look at these Algerian Tirailleurs (photos taken in 1913). Compare the uniforms, but especially compare the uniform of the officers shown in these two photos with the uniform of all those officers of Zouaves.

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Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 7:40 a.m. PST

Grelber,

In 1895, the Zouave officers' dolman was replaced by the tunic of the general model of the troupes à pied (French infantry). The general appearance between Zouave and Line officers was practically the same (the tunic and kepi were the same). The type of trousers was different.

About the white horse… I really don't know the answer. Perhaps to highlight the commander of one of the battalions of the regiment or even the regimental commander.

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP12 Jul 2018 7:46 a.m. PST

Great photos – thanks for sharing!

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 7:47 a.m. PST

Glad you guys liked the pics. More to come.

Red Jacket Supporting Member of TMP12 Jul 2018 7:55 a.m. PST

Imagine what they would look like in color. Great photos! Thanks.

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 8:14 a.m. PST

"Both wore white trousers on campaing and during maneuvers."

To clarify… Until 1914…

Privates, corporals and sergeants of Zouaves wore red trousers on special occasions (parades, certain types of ceremonies, etc.) and wore white trousers during drills, maneuvers and on campaign.

Algerian Tirailleurs' soldiers wore white trousers during drills, maneuvers and campaings, and during most parades and special events.

That was the norm, but sometimes…

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 9:17 a.m. PST

Zouaves on parade during the funeral of a French General (1910): link

Ramming12 Jul 2018 9:58 a.m. PST

Ah, I see what you mean, the officers are a giveaway. I've never seen Zouaves in anything other than red or Tirailleurs in anything other than white cotton in summer, blue woollen in winter – but then my interest and knowledge stops at 1870. I've learned something, thank you.

emckinney12 Jul 2018 11:15 a.m. PST

Interesting brass-catcher bag/collapsible drum.

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 12:10 p.m. PST

"Officers of Algerian Tirailleurs wore uniforms with totally different colors than those worn by the officers of Zouaves. Zouaves wore dark blue uniforms and Algerian Tirailleurs wore light blue uniforms (there were also some other minimal differences between the uniforms of Zouaves and Algerian Tirailleurs)."

Just clarifying (again)… Zouaves wore dark blue jackets and Algerian Tirailleurs wore light blue jackets. Red or white trousers for Zouaves and white or blue trousers for Algerian Tirailleurs.

My main interest also stops at 1870, Ramming. I simply love to study the units, battles and campaigns of the Second French Empire (especially the Zouaves). Btw… During the Second French Empire, French Zouaves fought on many occasions wearing white trousers (prescribed in the campaign dress).

Ramming12 Jul 2018 1:02 p.m. PST

I have McMahons entire Corps in 10mm, I'm familiar with these units up to and including Sedan, then my interest wanes somewhat. The minister of the Protestant church in Froeschwiller saw fields of dead Tirailleurs and compared them to cornflowers. I have never seen a photograph or painting of Zouaves during the Imperial phase of the 1870 war in anything other than red. When did they wear white do you know, Crimea, Mexico ?

Personal logo StoneMtnMinis Supporting Member of TMP12 Jul 2018 2:05 p.m. PST

Great find and a lot of interesting comments. Even though it is not my period of interest, the photos and comments were very enlightening. Thanks for posting.

Dave
WargamingMiniatures.com

Cuirassier12 Jul 2018 3:44 p.m. PST

French Zouaves wore white trousers on many combats and battles during the Crimean War, Franco-Austrian War (Italian Campaign of 1859), French Intervention in Mexico and Franco-Prussian War.

THESE IMAGES ARE VERY LARGE. RIGHT-CLICK ON THE IMAGES, COPY AND PASTE THE URL/ADDRESS OF THE PHOTOS, THEN CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE THEM.

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Rare photo of the flag, what was left of it, and imperial eagle of the 2nd French Zouaves. This photo was taken after the bloody Battle of Solferino, the decisive battle of the Franco-Austrian War (Italian campaign of 1859). The 2nd French Zouaves fought with great courage and tenacity in 1859, especially at Magenta (as did the other three French Zouave regiments).

At the Battle of Magenta, the 2nd Zouaves fought against Austrian troops in Rare photo of the flag, what was left of it, and imperial eagle of the 2nd French Zouaves. This photo was taken after the bloody Battle of Solferino, the decisive battle of the Franco-Austrian War (Italian campaign of 1859). The 2nd French Zouaves fought with great courage and tenacity in 1859, especially at Magenta.

At the Battle of Magenta, the 2nd Zouaves fought against Austrian troops in close and hand-to-hand combat through the streets and houses of Magenta. The Zouaves captured approximately 500 Austrian infantry soldiers and the flag of the 9th Austrian infantry regiment during the engagement and for this feat of arms the regiment was awarded with the cross of the Légion d'honneur. It was the first regiment in the French army to have its imperial eagle decorated with the Légion d'honneur. The 2nd Zouaves lost 14 officers and 285 men at Magenta and lost 4 officers and 62 men at Solferino. The imperial eagle of the regiment was hit during the fight, either by canister or rifle fire, but the projectile didn't penetrate all the way through the eagle. The flag was damaged beyond repair.

Take a look at this French veteran… He's the real deal. Veteran of the Crimean War and Franco-Austrian War, he was also decorated with the Medaille Militaire for bravery.

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Zouaves wearing the campaign dress (with white trousers), painted between 1865 and 1870 by contemporary artist Armand Dumaresq.

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REGIMENT OF ZOUAVES OF THE FRENCH IMPERIAL GUARD (1854-1870)

Zouaves of the Imperial Guard wearing the campaign dress, with white trousers, during maneuvers at the Camp of Châlons in 1866. Click on the images to enlarge it:

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"Le Dernier du Bataillon", painted by Jules Monge (the actual painting is in colors). Click on the image to enlarge it:: link

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Iron Men… Those French Zouaves were iron men. At the Battle of Froeschwiller (6 August, 1870), during the Franco-Prussian War, all three regiments of Zouaves fought like lions. Against superior firepower and great odds, the Zouaves fought with extraordinary skill, tenacity and ferocity. They repulsed many German infantry assaults… They held their ground at great cost… They covered the retreat of other French units and, because of all that, they suffered heavy casualties. The 2nd Zouaves lost 47 officers and 1,088 men at Froeschwiller. The regiment's commander, Colonel Détrie, was seriously wounded and captured by the Prussians that terrible day. He survived and went on to become a General of Division.

Colonel Détrie in 1870 (four weeks before the start of the war):

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The end of the bloody Battle of Froeschwiller (august 6, 1870)… The scene: The 1st French Zouaves was the last French regiment to leave the field, withdrawing under heavy fire as though on parade. Withdrawing with their pride intact. The regiment suffered 500 casualties that day. French Zouaves did "splendid work" that terrible day.

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Edouard Detaille also put the Zouaves fighting in white trousers at the Battle of Froeschwiller. Click on the image to enlarge it: link

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French Zouaves and Algerian Tirailleurs fighting at Wörth/Froeschwiller (can't remember the name of the painter). Click on the image to enlarge it: link

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"Essuyant le Feu" by Alphonse de Neuville… Scene from the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71). We can see soldiers from many French units fighting together, desperately fighting. Zouave wearing white trousers.

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"Zouave" by Paul Louis Narcisse Grolleron. French Zouave in 1870.

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Cuirassier13 Jul 2018 9:47 a.m. PST

Zouaves of the French Imperial Guard at the Camp of Châlons. Photo taken in 1857. In the extreme right of this image, take a look at the zouave in campaign dress.

RIGHT-CLICK ON THE IMAGE, COPY AND PASTE THE URL/ADDRESS OF THE PHOTO, THEN CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE IT.

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Cuirassier13 Jul 2018 10:18 a.m. PST

During the Second French Empire, Zouave officers also wore white trousers during campaigns (especially during summer time).

This is Captain Louis François Joseph Faustin Breune of the 3rd French Zouaves. This photo was taken in Mexico, two weeks after the capture of Puebla. Breune died in Mexico, in february of 1864. He was with the 3rd Zouaves since 1852. Breune was wounded in 1854 and 1860, both times during combats in Algeria (expeditions against rebels in the Kabylie region). In 1859, during the Franco-Austrian War, the 3rd Zouaves fought with great tenacity and ferocity at the Battle of Palestro, ensuring victory for the French (at a enormous cost). Breune was there commanding the 4th Company, 2nd Battalion of the 3rd Zouaves.

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Cuirassier13 Jul 2018 9:09 p.m. PST

"… Zouave officers also wore white trousers during campaigns (especially during summer time)."

But not always… Sometimes…

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