Help support TMP


"Foreigners who served in the Red Army in WWII" Topic


11 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the WWII Discussion Message Board



521 hits since 21 Jun 2018
©1994-2018 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP21 Jun 2018 10:03 p.m. PST

"During World War II there were dozens of military formations consisting of foreign nationals fighting alongside the Red Army to turn back the Nazi invasion. Romanians, Polish, Yugoslavians, French, Czechoslovakians, and Hungarians all fought to protect Russia. By 1945, there were a half million soldiers in these formations.

While the units were formally under the command of their countries' governments, they were integrated into the Red Army and were led by Soviet commanders…."
Main page

link


Amicalement
Armand

Dave Holden22 Jun 2018 1:53 a.m. PST

"The People's Polish Army began with the 1st Tadeusz Kosciuszko Infantry Division on May 6, 1943. It consisted of Poles that were in the USSR for various reasons"

"General Stanislav Poplavsky was the Commander of the First Polish Army. He wrote in his memoirs that the Soviet Army provided them with all the weapons and ammunition they needed but they lacked officers."

Who wrote this? The Kremlin?

kevanG22 Jun 2018 5:09 a.m. PST

A US para captured in Normandy fought for the russians for a while because he was "dead"

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP22 Jun 2018 6:51 a.m. PST

Dave's right. No one can be ignorant in that way by accident. And once you know a "non-fiction" author is trying to mislead you, he doesn't have much value.

Silurian22 Jun 2018 7:45 a.m. PST

I read an account once of a British pilot who voluntarily flew for the Russians. I believe his name was Johnny Redburn.

Blutarski22 Jun 2018 7:58 a.m. PST

"General Stanislav Poplavsky was the Commander of the First Polish Army. He wrote in his memoirs that the Soviet Army provided them with all the weapons and ammunition they needed but they lacked officers."


… The "lack" of Polish officers may have been related to the many thousands who were summarily exterminated by the Soviet NKVD in the Katyn Forest shortly after Poland's surrender.

B

rougeau22 Jun 2018 8:32 a.m. PST

Hi

No. 151 Wing Royal Air Force Operations in Russia, September–November 1941.

commanders
Wing Commander Henry Neville
Gynes Ramsbottom-Isherwood (1941)

Aircraft Hawker Hurricane IIB (1941)

link

French "Escadrille Normadie Niémen" 1943-45

normandieniemen.free.fr

Jcfrog Supporting Member of TMP22 Jun 2018 11:44 a.m. PST

Yes Normandie Niemen, great service. Very much remembered there.

A few " malgé lui" Alsatians manages to sesert and convince the ruski they were not Germans.

The Poles were by far the most numerous, from pro commie, and pow from 1940.

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP23 Jun 2018 12:44 p.m. PST

"Poles that were in the USSR for various reasons"

The "various reasons" being that the Soviet Union had conquered much of Poland two years prior and was using the enlisted Polish POW's for slave labor, having already shot the officers. Tango, do you read what you post links to?

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP24 Jun 2018 3:57 p.m. PST

Yes… and that don't mean that I'm agree with the text…

Amicalement
Armand

Frontovik02 Jul 2018 2:51 a.m. PST

Late to this but as a modelling challenge the Czechoslovakian Independent Battalion raised at Buzuluk is good.

They wore British uniforms, 39 pattern leather equipment and Brodie helmets (all left behind by the Anders Army when they shipped out for the Middle East) with Soviet weapons.

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.