Help support TMP


"F+I War and War of 1812 Highlanders." Topic


8 Posts

All members in good standing are free to post here. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the posters, and have not been cleared with nor are they endorsed by The Miniatures Page.

For more information, see the TMP FAQ.


Back to the War of 1812 Message Board



Areas of Interest

Napoleonic
19th Century

708 hits since 3 May 2018
©1994-2019 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Bowman03 May 2018 8:52 a.m. PST

Quick question: How different are these troops in dress during these two conflicts? I have the Kings Mountain Highlanders for the FIW/AWI. How wrong would they be for War of 1812?

Thanks for any help.

22ndFoot03 May 2018 9:24 a.m. PST

Other than the 93rd at New Orleans, who didn't wear kilts, there weren't any Highlanders engaged in the War of 1812:

link

So it really depends on how far off the piste you want to go. The most obvious visible wargaming difference between the various periods is the bonnet which is not to say there weren't other differences which went from a flat blue bonnet in the FIW to a blocked bonnet in the AWI to the feathered bonnet of the Napoleonic period.

Another big difference is that in the FIW Highlanders often wore leggings in the field ( link ) and in the AWI they exchanged their kilts for overalls ( link ) fairly early. As I said, the 93rd didn't wear kilts at New Orleans and wore a blocked bonnet without the feathers.

link

If this doesn't matter to you, go for it. If it does as it does for me don't.

Glengarry503 May 2018 12:56 p.m. PST

It has been speculated that in the eastern counties of Stormont, Glengarry and Dundas with a large Scots Loyalist population there may have been militia wearing some form of highland dress with civilian clothes. Apparently American officers reported facing "Highlanders" in places where there were none so perhaps it was these militiamen they saw? They would bear little resemblance to the Highlanders of the F&I or AWI.

link

attilathepun4703 May 2018 9:43 p.m. PST

Personally, I would not object to substituting a Napoleonic era Highland unit in kilts for the 93rd with their trews (trousers made up from tartan fabric). But the differences between French & Indian war Highlanders & 1812 are just too big to swallow. In the mid-18th century the Highlanders were still carrying their full arsenal of broadsword, dirk, and pistols, in addition to musket and bayonet; the belting was black, the bonnets as described above, and the jacket quite different & usually worn open in front. If memory serves, sporrans were still worn in the field too.

Major Bloodnok05 May 2018 2:26 a.m. PST

The kilts are very different, the belted plaid being worn in the 1700's, by the 1800's they were wearing the small kilt. The F&I regimental coats were lapeled, larger cuffs than 1812, and cuff flaps.

Personal logo Florida Tory Supporting Member of TMP06 May 2018 10:41 a.m. PST

Rene Chartrand states that the other battalion of the 93rd was stationed in maritime Canada during the award of 1812 – in kilts. (I believe it's in one of his Osprey books, but I'm not at home to check.)

Rick

Major Bloodnok07 May 2018 2:00 p.m. PST

Weren't the 93rd one of the few highland regiments allowed to wear the kilt?

Bowman24 May 2018 8:19 a.m. PST

Hmmm……I'm not actually interested in the Battle of New Orleans. I live in southern Ontario in the midst of many War of 1812 battles. I have the Kings Mountain Miniatures who wear the feathered bonnet and trews. I was hoping that an obscure battle had employed Highlanders and therefore I'd have two ready made units. Not to be it seems. Thanks for the help everyone.

Bowman12 Jun 2018 7:51 p.m. PST

Actually, except for the feathered bonnet, the FIW highlanders from Kings Mountain Miniatures look very similar to the Dundas and Stormont county Militia of 1813. Right down to the cuffs, blocked bonnet and brown pants. I think it is quite possible that US troops thought they were facing "highlanders" and reported it so.

I think I can use my highlanders as local militia without going to far "off pointe" to use the phrase.

Thanks for the link, Colin.

Sorry - only verified members can post on the forums.