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"He Had Won for Himself an Honorable Name: The ..." Topic


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521 hits since 11 Jan 2018
©1994-2018 Bill Armintrout
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP11 Jan 2018 12:08 p.m. PST

… the Royal Marines of the Napoleonic Wars.

"THE ROYAL MARINES were the unsung British heroes of the Napoleonic Wars. They played distinguished roles in many engagements both at sea and on land; their motto of per mare, per terram reflects this. Yet all too often, their gallant conduct is merely alluded to rather than discussed in detail by both naval historians and maritime novelists. C. S. Forester's Hornblower series was a particular offender in this regard. The Royal Navy furnishes the stars and the Royal Marines supply the extras. Marines are red coated ciphers who exist chiefly to die quickly, much like the Red Shirts in the original Star Trek television series. Admiral Lord St. Vincent, who helped them secure the "royal" designation in 1802, said of them: "If real danger should ever come to England, they will be this country's sheet anchor."…"
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Amicalement
Armand

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP11 Jan 2018 12:08 p.m. PST

…Untimely Death of John Chambliss

"The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign witnessed many dark days for the Army of Northern Virginia, but one that has received scant attention is August 16, 1864. On that day, Lee's army lost two brigadier generals. This post will briefly examine the life of Brig. Gen. John R. Chambliss, Jr. and the impact his death had upon events north of the James in 1864.


John R. Chambliss, Jr. was a native of Greensville County, Virginia. He was the son of John R. Chambliss, Sr., a lawyer who would later serve in the First Confederate Congress and would tragically outlive his son by 11 years. The future Confederate general went to West Point and soon became close friends with future Union cavalier David McM. Gregg. He graduated 31st in the Class of 1853, which also included John Bell Hood, Phil Sheridan, and James B. McPherson among others. He resigned after teaching at the cavalry school at Carlisle and was a civilian until he joined the local militia in 1858. When war broke out he was an aide-de-camp to Henry A. Wise and colonel of the 41st Virginia Infantry before transferring to the 13th Virginia Cavalry…."
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Amicalement
Armand

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