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"The Myth of the Antebellum South" Topic


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1,301 hits since 21 Dec 2017
©1994-2018 Bill Armintrout
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP21 Dec 2017 12:15 p.m. PST

"Americans, if auld lang syne ever comes to mind, look back on the Old South and the Old West through the distorting spectacles of school history, cinema, television, and other fictional sources. The Old West is seen as gun duels, white cowboys, manifest destiny, and homely wisdom. The role of the girls in the saloons is not brought up. It was actually murder from ambush, bitter struggle and ethnic cleansing, domination of the weak by the strong, corruption, veniality, waste, and illiteracy. The natives who did not perish by the gun were destroyed by religion.

The Old South, in imagination, was a land of prosperous plantations and happy Negroes, large white houses with window glass, cultured people who could read and write, music and literature, and a stable economy based on cotton. It was actually one of the most unpleasant and hellish societies ever invented by man, and one well on the way to dissolution when it was destroyed in fire and war. The peculiar institution, slavery, sheltered horrors that are difficult to appreciate from this distance. It was curious in a 'free' country to meet with kaffles of chained slaves being driven along the National Road, a sight that impressed many a European traveler.

If a young buck killed a slave, his family was liable for the value of the slave, not the slave's life. Killing a free black was probably cheaper. When a slave murdered a white, he could be burnt at the stake. This happened not once, but at Knoxville, New Orleans, and other places. The judiciary was present among the executioners; it can't be excused by calling it a lynch mob: it was official. The region was in constant apprehension and terror of slave rebellion, and with good reason. Dogs were specially bred to track Negroes, and men made manhunting a trade. Literary decency made open discussion of the sexual aspects of slavery impossible. Few people now even realize that open prostitution was a universal feature of American cities and towns until relatively recently, regularly resorted to by the male element. Recently, some people were appalled at the suggestion that Thomas Jefferson could have had sexual relations with a slave. Actually, most of the little blacks around Monticello tended to look like massa Tom. This practice was not exceptional, it was common. Later, when the exhausted soil meant that slave-breeding was the only possible employment for Virginia planters, the owner and overseers did the honors, up to the limits of their abilities. It is seen today in the faces of African-Americans. A darker subject is necrophilia, which the slave society made available if one had the money. This still seems to be practiced in the South, but does not appear in the daily papers except by innuendo…"
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Amicalement
Armand

Personal logo Cacique Caribe Supporting Member of TMP21 Dec 2017 1:22 p.m. PST

"A darker subject is necrophilia, which the slave society made available if one had the money."

What the … Man, now I'm really afraid to read on. Who writes this stuff? Geesh.

Wow. Not much of a gaming topic, is it? Doesn't spark any scenarios I would ever want to play.

Dan

Ostrowski Inactive Member21 Dec 2017 3:00 p.m. PST

Utter drivel. Clearly written by someone who has never been to the South.

Extrabio1947 Supporting Member of TMP21 Dec 2017 3:58 p.m. PST

Only difference between this and a bucket of poo is the bucket. Seriously, Tango…

23rdFusilier21 Dec 2017 4:05 p.m. PST

An interesting senario could be Major Merril and detachments of the 7th cavalry fighting the KKK during reconstruction.

Noble Crow21 Dec 2017 6:18 p.m. PST

This kind of garbage really pisses me off. The "author" claims that calling it a "civil war" was a strictly Confederate notion, and that in the North the war was only referred to as the War of the Rebellion. To that I would say, apparently Abraham Lincoln didn't get the memo, and one only has to look as far as the second sentence of a little speech he once gave in Gettysburg ("Now we are engaged in a great civil war….").
And of course the author made comparisons to the Nazis. Garbage, pure garbage!

lkmjbc321 Dec 2017 9:47 p.m. PST

Simply anti-white propaganda. This is quite mild compared to what is coming in the future.

Joe Collins

Personal logo Cacique Caribe Supporting Member of TMP21 Dec 2017 10:33 p.m. PST

Joe

I'm afraid you are exactly right.

Supremacists of all colors need to be stopped, or this is simply gonna get worse instead of better.

Dan

Dn Jackson22 Dec 2017 5:42 p.m. PST

Complete drivel.

Dn Jackson22 Dec 2017 5:44 p.m. PST

Complete drivel. Unfortunatly this is what passes for history in some colleges.

ScottS22 Dec 2017 7:01 p.m. PST

I tend to be very pro-Union in my views, but this is just silly. Systematic necrophilia? I can believe slave owners raped or forced slaves into sex, but necrophilia is ridiculous.

Slavery was awful enough; there's no reason to make up ludicrous stories to make it seem worse than it was. Doing this is "crying wolf" and only brings discredit to the real histories.

donlowry23 Dec 2017 9:57 a.m. PST

It's not a myth -- there really was a South before the war (antebellum).

Bill N23 Dec 2017 10:22 a.m. PST

Prove it Don.

Old Glory Sponsoring Member of TMP23 Dec 2017 2:02 p.m. PST

I enjoy Lady Antebellum's songs and music ???
Is that the same??

Regards
Russ Dunaway

RudyNelson23 Dec 2017 3:52 p.m. PST

All foreigners and Yankees may think every southerner looks at this era with unrealistic ideas of how it was. That may be how others see it.

However those of us who have live in the rural south and listened to grand parents and aunts or uncles talk about life then. Almost all farms had no slaves and a few had one. They talked about cordwood roads, stagecoach way stations every ten miles. Constant stopping and changing trains is traveling by rail. River travel was common for goods but not people.
No stores for groceries which made you hunt or grow food for you and your family. Furniture was hand made from wood on the homestead. Few rural farmers used banks. If they got robbed, you lost your money. Education was limited to less than six grade.
There was no glorious view of the past era by the bulk of southerners.

muggins23 Dec 2017 6:07 p.m. PST

"Simply anti-white propaganda. This is quite mild compared to what is coming in the future."

Holy cow, lol. Is TMP now infowars™?

Old Glory Sponsoring Member of TMP23 Dec 2017 7:12 p.m. PST

The descriptions above of the "rural south" of long ago sound pretty much like the "rural anywhere" of long ago?

Regards
Russ Dunaway

Charlie 12 Inactive Member23 Dec 2017 7:34 p.m. PST

Pretty much. Change the weather and you could be just about anywhere in the US of the period. Rural is rural. Now the "systemic necrophilia"… Don't recall coming across that in any of my readings of the period or recollections by relatives down South (diaries and journals) or lectures by my profs…

RudyNelson23 Dec 2017 10:12 p.m. PST

Very true rural is rural and in the south that meant no slaves on small yeoman farms.

Personal logo Murphy Sponsoring Member of TMP24 Dec 2017 5:11 p.m. PST

There's a lot I would like to say about this, but it's the Christmas season and in the spirit of Christmas, I am just going to keep my mouth shut….

Old Peculiar24 Dec 2017 5:43 p.m. PST

As a non American, how does anti-Confederate writing become translated into anti-White propoganda. That seems to be as racist a comment as the original piece is claimed to be.

From my own point of view the reality of the Confederacy and the motivations of those who formed the peoples of that State will be a matter of endless and unfathomanable debate.

What is obvious is that the heraldry and regalia of the South is being paraded alongside and by blatant, violent neo-Nazis. And I have yet to see the proud defenders of Southern heritage stand up and loudly and clearly say that this is unacceptable, and a slur on the memory of those who fell for claimed Southern Rights.

So if they are silent about this attack on human rights and values, then they have no basis for argument when these divisive and hate ridden symbols are torn down or burned.

It is not a question of history, it is about symbols of hatred and oppression.

Blutarski24 Dec 2017 8:13 p.m. PST

I can't believe this foolishness is still going on. It's nothing but cynical click-bait IMHO.

Be sure to stay tuned for next week's big expose' on plantation devil worship in the South.

B

Dave Woodchuck Inactive Member26 Dec 2017 7:51 a.m. PST

Old Peculiar – the "anti-White propaganda" is probably the reference to the fact that this article, in no uncertain terms, accuses current, living southerners of necrophilia while claiming that the entirety of media in complicit, reducing the shocking reports to oblique innuendo. Given that the victims are implied to be black, the perps may be reasonably assumed to be white by the logic of this article.

I'd say this is less anti-white propaganda and more the fevered dreams of a delusional idiot placed out into public.

What is the over/under on the author having body parts store in his fridge?

Cleburne186326 Dec 2017 10:36 a.m. PST

Well, we wouldn't have to endure "cynical click-bait" if it wasn't posted here in the first place.

Bill N26 Dec 2017 6:08 p.m. PST

What is obvious is that the heraldry and regalia of the South is being paraded alongside and by blatant, violent neo-Nazis. And I have yet to see the proud defenders of Southern heritage stand up and loudly and clearly say that this is unacceptable, and a slur on the memory of those who fell for claimed Southern Rights.

The best way I can explain it is that it is a "the enemy of my enemy is someone that I might not want to attack" thing. There has been a multi-sided fight going on about the meaning of the Confederacy and its legacy since the war ended. The Southern heritage crowd has not been happy that Confederate symbols have been appropriated by more radical racists, but standing up to those racists might undermine its struggle against those who seek to have the Confederacy remembered in a much more negative light…if they are willing to have it remembered at all.

138SquadronRAF Supporting Member of TMP27 Dec 2017 10:15 a.m. PST

in the North the war was only referred to as the War of the Rebellion.

Technically it officially "The War of the Rebellion".

link


I'm with Old Peculiar on this.

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