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"Advice for aging eyes..." Topic


38 Posts

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899 hits since 3 Dec 2017
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BigJoeDuke03 Dec 2017 6:12 p.m. PST

In the past few years I have been painting les and less, one part due to time, another part not willing to admit I need bi-vocals. I have come to terms with my poor up close eye sight and now hve(had) transition lenses. Alas, these have become so scratched I had to switch back to my far-seeing glasses. I have 4x readers but I still have to have a miniature (28mm 40kOrk) inches from my face, not leaving much room for room for a brush. I have recently gotten the urge to,paint my Perry's Travel Battle minis but I am discouraged from the lack of up close eye sight. Long story short, anyone have any advice for upclose vision that 4x readers really aren't helping?

BigJoeDuke03 Dec 2017 6:12 p.m. PST

In the past few years I have been painting les and less, one part due to time, another part not willing to admit I need bi-vocals. I have come to terms with my poor up close eye sight and now hve(had) transition lenses. Alas, these have become so scratched I had to switch back to my far-seeing glasses. I have 4x readers but I still have to have a miniature (28mm 40kOrk) inches from my face, not leaving much room for room for a brush. I have recently gotten the urge to,paint my Perry's Travel Battle minis but I am discouraged from the lack of up close eye sight. Long story short, anyone have any advice for upclose vision that 4x readers really aren't helping?

BigJoeDuke03 Dec 2017 6:12 p.m. PST

In the past few years I have been painting les and less, one part due to time, another part not willing to admit I need bi-vocals. I have come to terms with my poor up close eye sight and now hve(had) transition lenses. Alas, these have become so scratched I had to switch back to my far-seeing glasses. I have 4x readers but I still have to have a miniature (28mm 40kOrk) inches from my face, not leaving much room for room for a brush. I have recently gotten the urge to,paint my Perry's Travel Battle minis but I am discouraged from the lack of up close eye sight. Long story short, anyone have any advice for upclose vision that 4x readers really aren't helping?

BigJoeDuke03 Dec 2017 6:14 p.m. PST

Whoa! Bug or judicious hitting of the post button? Sorry!

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 6:30 p.m. PST

Just out of curiousity, how well can you see without glasses?

I need my glasses for anything past two feet, but under two feet my vision is excellent

Personal logo jeffreyw3 Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 6:40 p.m. PST

I would not be painting now, without an Optivisor.

FusilierDan Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 6:42 p.m. PST

I use inexpensive "readers" and have for 15 years. I need to hold the figure about 15 inches away from me to see them clearly. Mine are 1.5-1.75 depending on the pair and what I'm doing. I don't wear glasses other than for reading or to close in work.

Personal logo Narratio Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 6:54 p.m. PST

Yep, really bad close up view and rubbish long range for that matter. So I also vote for the optivisor, easier than a magnifying ring light.

Hlaven Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 6:59 p.m. PST

Optivisor

Neal Smith03 Dec 2017 7:05 p.m. PST

Optivisor

I've even seen improvement in my painting since I can now see the figures… :)

ced110603 Dec 2017 7:39 p.m. PST

Ott light bulb or any other strong light.

Personal logo Grelber Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 9:06 p.m. PST

Good lighting, definitely.
I have an optivisor, which I use some of the time.
My glasses--bifocals--do not allow my eyes to focus properly at painting distances, so I take them off to paint.
I tried one of those magnifiers on an arm, but it didn't work very well for me.

Grelber
No doubt, getting old sucks.

basileus6603 Dec 2017 9:39 p.m. PST

I do as Fusilier Dan does. Readers for painting are good enough for me (1-1.25)

Personal logo Striker Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 9:43 p.m. PST

I've got reading glasses now but I've had an optivisor for years. The arm-magnifier never really worked for me and just got dusty.

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2017 9:44 p.m. PST

Replacing the scratched lenses might be in order.

McKinstry Fezian03 Dec 2017 10:17 p.m. PST

Optivisor plus good/strong lighting.

I painted the handle on a bucket being carried by a 6mm artillerist yesterday and could see it clearly.

bruntonboy03 Dec 2017 11:17 p.m. PST

Proper pair of prescription specs for close up work. Tell the optician they are for close up distance- demonstrate what you do. Reading specs tend to be set up focusing for a little further away then our painting distance. A dcenet light preferably with a low flicker daylight ulb. Like others have said I have tried a magnifier and optivisor I have struggled with those although I will use the magnifier on very tricky bits.

Consider your undercoat- if painting on black it can be difficult to pick out details. Consider a light drybrush of a slightly lighter shade to help pick up the detail and lastly……paint to your vision. There is little point painting what you can't see without peering closely at them, mind you I have always done this anyway.

bobspruster04 Dec 2017 1:24 a.m. PST

I wear trifocals and my depth perception is rather bad due to a lazy eye. I use a lighted magnifier on an arm and clip on magnifiers on my glasses. I occasionally use them in tandem. I also took a hint from Henry Hyde's book and have two sources of light on my bench to eliminate shadows.

377CSG04 Dec 2017 3:03 a.m. PST

Optivisor

Durban Gamer04 Dec 2017 3:25 a.m. PST

I have old eyes and some astigmatism, but solved problem: good optician made me up bifocals set correct distance for painting. Has 1.5 magnify. Added x3 magnify cheap reading glasses in a wide frame which I wear over bifocals. Works like a charm even on 6mm figs.

rustymusket Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 4:11 a.m. PST

I have no-line bifocal lenses and an Optivisor, so I don't have a better suggestion. Sorry. Good luck!

Dynaman878904 Dec 2017 6:04 a.m. PST

Optivisor here. I use it with a set of specific set of reading glasses too. I have to keep the visor at just the right spot in front of the glasses to get a perfect view, which is fiddly, but it works.

Lucius04 Dec 2017 6:08 a.m. PST

For me, magnification is less important than the quality of the glasses.

My advice – get an Ott light, and get a new pair of prescription transition lenses from a real optometrist. Yes, it is is expensive, but there is no substitute for having the right glasses.

I just replaced the lenses in my high-dollar transitional glasses. They were scratched as well – mostly from cleaning them on my shirt-tail instead of with a lens cloth. It makes a huge difference.

Garryowen Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 6:11 a.m. PST

I have the "no line" bifocals and I wear a pair of drug store magnifier or reading glasses in front of them. I probably look stupid, but together they work fine for me. Without the magnifiers in front I can't cut it anymore.

Tom

Gone Fishing04 Dec 2017 6:22 a.m. PST

Like Dan and a number of others, I use reading glasses (1.25) and they work great! Don't need glasses except for this and reading.

Kevin C Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 6:48 a.m. PST

I am 49 and have pretty good vision, but about six years ago I started needing reading glasses (1.25 and for very small print 1.5). When I paint I use an optivisor and cheap Walmart reading glasses at the same time. The combination looks pretty stupid, but they get the job done. I wouldn't worry too much about not being able to paint. With a few minor adjustments you should be able to paint for many years to come.

Personal logo rampantlion Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 7:05 a.m. PST

Cheap reader glasses and a good light for me.

BigJoeDuke04 Dec 2017 7:17 a.m. PST

thanks all for the hints, I get new glasses next month (insurance renews in Jan.), so the scratched lenses will no longer be an issue, I will definitely look into all the suggestions here, thanks again!

nnascati Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 8:58 a.m. PST

I use 4.25 reading glasses, works fine for me.

Oberlindes Sol LIC04 Dec 2017 10:01 a.m. PST

Agreed on Optivisor and bright light.

I found my optivisor at a yard sale for a dollar! I washed it with ordinary dishwashing liquid soap. The lenses weren't scratched at all. It makes a huge difference in my painting comfort and quality, and my eyesight isn't all that bad.

When it's warm and sunny, I paint outside, sitting on my patio. The sun provides excellent light.

For painting indoors, I have a nice, bright, light on arm with a magnifier, but I don't usually use the magnifier, preferring my Optivisor. Setting up a second light can be helpful.

I was at the watchmaker's yesterday, and one of the guys at the bench had a loupe on a stiff wire that wrapped around his head and held the loupe in his eye socket. He could magnify his subject like 40 times, enough to paint stubble on an infantryman's face. I want one.

Personal logo Tommy20 Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 10:25 a.m. PST

I have prescription reading glasses, but for painting I wear these ( link ) OVER the prescription ones. Works a charm.

Personal logo PrivateSnafu Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 2:39 p.m. PST

Dude make a trip to the optometrist and get new glasses.

Ragbones Supporting Member of TMP04 Dec 2017 9:26 p.m. PST

My wife bought me an Ott magnifying lamp recently. Works well.

Personal logo Tommy20 Supporting Member of TMP05 Dec 2017 10:35 a.m. PST

PrivateSnafu:
Dude make a trip to the optometrist and get new glasses.

LOL! My prescription is perfect for reading or using a computer. They don't magnify enough for painting though.

steamingdave4705 Dec 2017 11:29 a.m. PST

Light, light and more light plus proper prescription glasses.
I find daylight LED desk lamps (5000k or so), rated at around 6 or 7 watts give enough light for my 70 year old eyes to paint figures from 6mm up to 28mm. I have (expensive) vari- focal prescription lenses and always tell the optician about my hobbies. Tried an Optivisor, hated it. I usually use white undercoat as it obscures less detail than black. I sometimes use black, but always drybrush with white to pick out details.

Oberlindes Sol LIC05 Dec 2017 11:39 a.m. PST

The vocabulary word for this topic is presbyopia, literally, "old eyes". I have it.

DanWW207 Jan 2018 6:12 p.m. PST

I use a magnifying lamp with a circular daylight bulb around the lens. It's 3 dioptre/ 1.75x magnification.

My eyesight's pretty good, but there's not a lot of natural daylight where I can sit to paint, and the days are short this time of year.

I tend to use it for the whole process, not just fine details, and didn't realise how much quicker painting is with it until today when the bulb flickered then died!

Bulbs last a long time, but they're about £10.00 GBP each and only available online where I live.

Personal logo Bowman Supporting Member of TMP10 Jan 2018 10:26 a.m. PST

I use a magnifying lamp with a circular daylight bulb around the lens.

This is my preference too. I wear $4,500 USD prescription illuminated surgical loupes for work and really don't want to wear more gear on my head when at home. I normally wear progressive bi-focal glasses for seeing and the lamp accommodates them well.

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