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"Most incompetent commander to have a base named after him. " Topic


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805 hits since 31 Oct 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 8:17 a.m. PST

I've always felt that there is an inverse relationship between the competence of a commander and the size and importance of the base/fort/etc named after him.
It's just a general feeling, easily fact checked. So, smallest base does not equal greatest commander.

Let's just say that it's amazing how Braxton Bragg has such a big and important base named after him.

So, my first nominee is Bragg.

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 8:20 a.m. PST

Is it only Americans who name bases after commanders, competent or otherwise?

Personal logo Private Matter Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 8:57 a.m. PST

+1 on Bragg

I nominate Ft Custer.

cfuzwuz Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 8:59 a.m. PST

Fort Devens in Mass. Warned of Jackson's flank attack at Chanslorsville(sp) he did nothing.

23rdFusilier Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 9:22 a.m. PST

Having lived on Fort Devens for over six years it always amused me that Jackson road runs right through the base as its main road. When I pointed it out none of my neighbors knew who these names were.

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 9:26 a.m. PST

Hood should certainly be a contender. (Yes, of course I'd feel differently if he'd been KIA at Gettysburg. He wasn't.)

The Germans name kassernes after generals--carefully screened for political correctness, not military competence. If I knew which Wrede they named a base after, he might well be a contender.

One of these days, we'll need a German army, and guess what?

DisasterWargamer Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 9:43 a.m. PST

I always though March Air Reserve Base was interesting in that I believe it was named for a 2nd LT who died shortly after his commission – but was the son of the Army Chief at the time…

Hafen von Schlockenberg Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 10:28 a.m. PST

There's a Fort Cornwallis in Malaysia.

Dadster Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 10:34 a.m. PST

Not all were like Bragg – here's one that would be forgotten if he hadn't had a base name after him – but he was no dummy:

Fort Sill – Home of the Field Artillery

link

Personal logo Parzival Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 10:41 a.m. PST

Fort McClellan.
If Wikipedia is accurate, it's now a toxic disaster area.
Which seems appropriate.

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 1:17 p.m. PST

Bragg is a good choice but my nod goes to Hood- after all, he essentially managed to destroy his own command

Interesting story about poor old Sill – see what comes of not paying attention being at least a little bit fastidious!

Also – how come the US military names all those places after traitors to the Republic? I don't recall the Brits having an HMS Charles Stuart

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 1:26 p.m. PST

Fort Guy Fawkes?

forrester01 Nov 2017 2:18 p.m. PST

In the UK, I don't think we have forts as such, but army barracks can be named after commanders..though with a litle more care, as I think they include Wellington and Moore.

Extrabio1947 Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 3:49 p.m. PST

Being a Middle Tennessean, my choice is Hood, hands down. His petulant temper caused the deaths of 6,000 very brave men.

robert piepenbrink Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 4:31 p.m. PST

Frederick, we've done this before and recently. The operating US theory for 100 years is that secessionists were all Americans now, and no one was to try this again. So part of the Stonewall Brigade went ashore on D-Day, and the Confederate Battle Flag flew in Korea and Vietnam.

I know the Brits have taken a different attitude toward the Irish, the Russians toward Ukrainian nationalists and the Spanish central government toward Catalans. How have those policies been working out for them?

(And lest anyone ask, Great-Grandfather Ernst marched with the 74th Indiana Volunteers. I know which side was right. I also know that you only pursue a family quarrel until you win, and you leave the loser his pride.)

peterx Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 5:49 p.m. PST

Another vote for Fort Custer.

Shagnasty Supporting Member of TMP01 Nov 2017 5:49 p.m. PST

Well said Robert P.

Dn Jackson01 Nov 2017 9:42 p.m. PST

"Also how come the US military names all those places after traitors to the Republic? I don't recall the Brits having an HMS Charles Stuart"

Because until the current wave of political correctness swept all sanity out the window, they weren't considered traitors. Why do you think Davis was never tried as a traitor? Because Johnson knew he would be found not guilty by the Supreme Court.

My vote is for Bragg, he actually got in an argument with himself.

mildbill02 Nov 2017 3:27 a.m. PST

The confederates were legally right and morally wrong. Slavery was legal and a good constitutional argument for succession could be made.
The Federals were morally right and legally wrong.
All the issues that were behind the Civil War (except Slavery) are still being fought politically.
I agree with Robert P.

DeRuyter Supporting Member of TMP02 Nov 2017 8:56 a.m. PST

Frederick, we've done this before and recently. The operating US theory for 100 years is that secessionists were all Americans now, and no one was to try this again. So part of the Stonewall Brigade went ashore on D-Day, and the Confederate Battle Flag flew in Korea and Vietnam.

I know the Brits have taken a different attitude toward the Irish, the Russians toward Ukrainian nationalists and the Spanish central government toward Catalans. How have those policies been working out for them?

(And lest anyone ask, Great-Grandfather Ernst marched with the 74th Indiana Volunteers. I know which side was right. I also know that you only pursue a family quarrel until you win, and you leave the loser his pride.)

Many of those folks left with their pride have to be constantly reminded that their side lost the war. In particular with regard to the continuation of slavery by other means long after the war ended. So yeah the only country honoring the losing side in a civil war and you can see how that's working out for us today.

Gunfreak Supporting Member of TMP02 Nov 2017 1:17 p.m. PST

Because until the current wave of political correctness swept all sanity out the window, they weren't considered traitors. Why do you think Davis was never tried as a traitor? Because Johnson knew he would be found not guilty by the Supreme Court.

No they tried to "heal wounds" by being overly nice to the south.
And we saw and still see how well that strategy worked out.

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP02 Nov 2017 1:36 p.m. PST

I've always been a fan of Reconstruction and the Radical Republicans.

Why would Jefferson Davis, or Robert E Lee for that matter, be found "not guilty" by the Supreme Court?
If treason is defined as

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

Well, duh.
The only reason I can see would be if the Court were all Democrats.

rmaker02 Nov 2017 5:21 p.m. PST

The confederates were legally right and morally wrong. Slavery was legal and a good constitutional argument for succession could be made.

Only applies to the case of South Carolina. ALL the other seceding states (and a couple of non-seceding ones) committed acts of rebellion BEFORE their acts of secession were passed and sometimes before their state conventions even met.

Darkest Star Games Sponsoring Member of TMP03 Nov 2017 6:39 a.m. PST

Don't forget that Bragg had *2* forts/bases named after him. Fort Bragg, California, was the first and was named after him in like 1857 by the butter bar that established it, obviously before Bragg became a much larger dingdong. Though it was a garrison and not a proper fort, and now is a city, still counts!

Kevin C Supporting Member of TMP03 Nov 2017 5:44 p.m. PST

Camp Joseph T. Robinson. The camp's namesake died battling for the cause of packing the supreme court -- a fatal move on behalf of an ill-conceived cause.

Personal logo David Manley Supporting Member of TMP05 Nov 2017 8:47 p.m. PST

Thinking of Roosevelt's opinions on the guy, how about Fort Shafter?

dejvid07 Nov 2017 2:04 a.m. PST

This question inevitably is going to get mixed up with the around 10 USA bases named after generals who committed treason against the USA which is beyond bizarre. Bragg should be top of everyones list as he was not only treasonous but incompetent.

On the other hand he helped the USA win the war of the rebellion so maybe he deserves the gratitude of the USA after all. :-)

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