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"9 Simple Etiquette Rules for Better Warhammer 40K Games" Topic


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569 hits since 5 Oct 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
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Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 11:36 a.m. PST

"A hectic few weeks with storms in the Atlantic have kept my busy as well as an increase in military duties. Have finally balanced my schedule and gotten a few games in the new edition of Warhammer 40K…."
Main page
link

Amicalement
Armand

VVV reply06 Oct 2017 12:36 p.m. PST

Our local gaming club has asked players to wash regularly.

Personal logo DColtman Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 7:21 p.m. PST

That's a good piece to read. Thanks Armand!

doubleones07 Oct 2017 7:08 a.m. PST

Good post. I've had a few miserable games recently because of my opponent's behavior. One "I'm getting slaughtered, I'm going to quit now" and one "I have to leave early to pick up dinner for my wife" after a mere two turns. ARRRRRGGGH!

Tango01 Supporting Member of TMP07 Oct 2017 9:53 a.m. PST

Glad you like it boys!. (smile)


Amicalement
Armand

chromedog09 Oct 2017 1:01 a.m. PST

I walked into what was my "local" GW back in the day (mid summer, air-conditioning was not up to the task).

"Whoo! Is that the funk of 40,000 years I can smell?"

It wasn't a small store, either. It was one of the only two "battle bunkers" in the state, with 8 tables (6x4) to play on. It just didn't handle confined gamer stench.

ScottWashburn Sponsoring Member of TMP09 Oct 2017 8:41 a.m. PST

I'm curious about doubleones' statement of an opponent who quits a losing game. Is that really considered bad form? I mean if he yells and screams and throws his dice and packs up and leaves in a huff, then sure, that's bad form. But if a game is clearly lost is it required to keep playing until every last one of your figures has been destroyed, or is a polite concession and congratulations for the winner okay? I can see that in a tournament such a thing might mess up the scoring, so that should be avoided, but in a regular game?

Thomas Thomas Supporting Member of TMP10 Oct 2017 8:06 a.m. PST

Most of these problems are specific to 40K.

Need for complex pre-calculated lists with lots of dense information.

Many special rules and the difficulty of knowing what they are and which units have them (esp your opponents stuff – hard enough to remember your own). And this is a huge part of the game (even dominant).

Long turns where your opponent has nothing to do but watch you roll dice and recite special rules – easy to become disengaged or remember important business at home – like mowing the lawn.

Massive numbers of d6 bouncing all over the table, knocking stuff over, maybe cocked etc. Then you have to pick through and find the "hits", then come the re-rolls – time consuming busy work.

One sided battles where one player has beat the system by creating a killer army aganist which their opponent has no chance.

But if your going to commit to 40K these are good ideas: know the rules, have an organized list, try to warn opponents of some super nasty special power that you have – before they make a decision, try to roll the dice in a box or something, pick out success and re-roll those dice (dice DO NOT lose Mojo….), don't over do the points, urge the company to write better rules…(Ha Ha).

TomT

billthecat10 Oct 2017 3:07 p.m. PST

Indeed…. A sad commentary on the state of mainstream/FLGS/GW/tournament style gaming…
I always figured that there is no point in playing games with people that you wouldn't have dinner with.
As a side note, 'quitting early because you are losing' is an incredible display of poor sportsmanship. If someone pulled that in chess or football, there would be an outrage. The objective is to win, but the purpose of the game is to have fun (it's like telling a story): those who can't differentiate between the two are in a very sad state methinks. Or maybe they should just play CCGs…;)

Personal logo Pictors Studio Sponsoring Member of TMP11 Oct 2017 8:29 a.m. PST

"Need for complex pre-calculated lists with lots of dense information.

Many special rules and the difficulty of knowing what they are and which units have them (esp your opponents stuff hard enough to remember your own). And this is a huge part of the game (even dominant).

Long turns where your opponent has nothing to do but watch you roll dice and recite special rules easy to become disengaged or remember important business at home like mowing the lawn.

Massive numbers of d6 bouncing all over the table, knocking stuff over, maybe cocked etc. Then you have to pick through and find the "hits", then come the re-rolls time consuming busy work.

One sided battles where one player has beat the system by creating a killer army aganist which their opponent has no chance.
"

Odd, I played a game of 40K over the weekend and it had none of these things.

The Angry Piper Supporting Member of TMP11 Oct 2017 9:06 a.m. PST

ScottWashburn: I guess if both sides agree to call a game, it's not bad form. But otherwise I'm inclined to agree with billthecat and the author. Not every game goes your way, but when it does, it's kind of fun. Sometimes it's the other guy's turn to have fun. If you (not you, specifically of course)sulk about it, it's no fun for either of you.

Quick examples: Years back, I once played a WFB Dwarf vs. Orc campaign. I was the Orc player. I won the first skirmish scenario, and then got my green ass handed to me for the next seven games. I lost the campaign resoundingly. Did I quit early, ever? No. Why not? Because I honestly don't care whether I win or lose, I have fun just playing the game with my friends. And my friend was having a blast kicking my butt. I'd get him later…

In contrast, there was a player at our FLGS who gamed the system in 40K (and pretty much everything else he played). The specifics elude me as to how he did this (this was several editions ago, circa 1999 or so), but suffice it to say he had few friends and even fewer people who wanted to game with him casually. He rarely lost a game, but he didn't even seem to enjoy playing. All he cared about was winning. (I think he may have been a nationally ranked Grand Tournament player, but I really don't remember.)
Anyway, one day he took part in a store sponsored tournament and beat almost every opponent. Then he started losing, to a 12 year old kid. Not sure why: perhaps the dice were just not on his side. Once he realized the game wasn't going his way and he wasn't going to win the tournament, he displayed incredibly poor sportsmanship. He splashed dice (or barely rolled them, feigning boredom), he immediately removed his casualties to his storage box, in effect packing up while the game was still going on, and he made comments about how "cheap" his opponent's army was.

Coming from that guy, that was rich indeed. The kid won the tournament. The prize was $20 USD in store credit. The guy was a jerk, plain and simple. Was it really worth it?

IIRC, he now designs video games. Ironically, the guy who has absolutely no idea about how to have fun designs games for a living. Go figure.

Centurio Prime11 Oct 2017 9:39 a.m. PST

I have experienced all this stuff playing historicals and other games besides GW.

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