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"So tell me about Command & Colors" Topic


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Trajanus06 Oct 2017 1:12 a.m. PST

I've been looking at these for sometime, not as alternative minature rules, as the actual game.

Are they hard to pick up – I find learning board games hard work on occasions – and how's the period feel in them?

Also, the pile of expansions looks like the kind of money pit I recall from the days gone by, when one of the guys at the club started playing Squad Leader!

I believe there's Command card add ons as well as Russia, Austria, Prussia etc do any of these add significantly to the basic game?

I'm not interested in the "Epic" level or whatever it's called as l wouldn't be using them for multi player games but I understand there's a level above the basic game size, is that worth it?

Finally, I see their solo rating is pretty low, what's the chances of pushing that up?

I know there are board game reviews on the system but I'd like to hear fellow lead pushers views please.

JOHN CSONKA06 Oct 2017 1:46 a.m. PST

You will just have to play someone who has the game. I have played Ancient(with 15mm figure) and Napoleonic C&C and love both of them. Easy to play and enjoyable. Looking forward to playing Tricorn as well. Recommend :-)

Rhysius Cambrensis06 Oct 2017 2:33 a.m. PST

It is rubbish. Don't bother if you like any other rule sets. They are not an intelligent set of rules, nor is there any period flavour.

advocate06 Oct 2017 3:15 a.m. PST

I've played a lot of Command & Colors, both Ancient and Napoleonic. When you compare the two periods there is a surprising amount of differentiation given the similarities in the two rulesets. They are primarily a game, rather than a simulation, but they don't shy away from unbalanced scenarios (the solution being to play it twice, swopping sides and comparing results).

I don't think they are hard to pick up: basically you play a card and get to activate the number of units permitted in the area specified (there are other cards). Movement and combat are straightforward, though as you accumulate the different add-ons, the different national rules and troop types do increase. But they do make the different nations play in their own way (French are better up close; British at a distance, Austrians get bigger units but can be vulnerable in their own way, for example).

If you get all the expansions, it would be a lot of money, but start with the basic game and build up. There are a lot of scenarios in each box, and will take a time to play through. Finish one then get the next. I've had more than my money's worth from each I've bought (calculated at £1.00 GBP per player hour).

It's hard to see how to improve solo play: the game depends very much on card play, and if you know what your opponent holds, that will affect things. There may be variants out there though.

The Man With Two Bryans06 Oct 2017 4:02 a.m. PST

I can tell you it's called Commands & Colors for a start

Dynaman878906 Oct 2017 4:06 a.m. PST

> Are they hard to pick up – I find learning board games hard work on occasions – and how's the period feel in them?

EASY – but don't take my word for it, download the rules and scenario book and decide for yourself.

link

Flavor – It is on the bland side.

Expansions – you only buy the armies you want. I've got the base game and the Spanish army. Might get the Russians someday (even as much as they are it is cheaper than miniatures)

Addons – The Spanish one added a few cards and rules for the Spanish army. Can't say about the others but I think it is the same.

Epic – Can't say but it allows tripling the basic game battle size. The standard game was good enough for me.

Solo – It all revolves around card play, it would be like trying to play Poker solo.

My take – a fun light game with Napoleonic seasoning but not really an attempt at a simulation. It is a heck of a lotta fun.

CATenWolde06 Oct 2017 4:18 a.m. PST

I've played a lot of Memoire '44 (the WWII version that I think got the ball rolling) with my son. If C&C is a direct descendant, which I think it is, it's a fun tactical-puzzle game with enough period chrome to get you "in the moment" if you don't think too hard about it. Great to get a youngster (or newbie oldster!) playing, or for a quick break. You can easily play a couple of games in a short afternoon or evening session.

For Memoire '44, play is as follows. The boards are nicely done, with various hexagonal terrain pieces that you can use to customize each scenario. Units are represented by different numbers of playing pieces (in M44 they are models, but in C&C I believe they are blocks), and each different unit/weapon type has different characteristics, usually boiling down to how far they can move, how far they can fight and with how many dice, and how likely it is to inflict hits on them (represented by when their symbol comes up on the dice thrown by the enemy). Since each hit removes a model/piece, some units are more resilient to damage. Terrain has simple but meaningful effects on movement and combat. C&C is represented by a variable number of cards in each player's hand – usually 4-6. The cards will usually tell you how many units you can activate that turn, and in what sector (the board is divided into three sectors). There are also various "special effect" cards with various purposes. The goal is to use your cards to the best advantage, given your units and the scenario objectives.

I think that covers it – again, from the Memoire '44 point of view. I don't if this is true of C&C, but for M44 there are dozens (scores? hundreds?) of player created scenarios freely available on the web.

Cheers,

Christopher

Frederick Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 4:29 a.m. PST

Only played the Napoleonic one but it is a quick fun game – and 9 year olds can master it

thosmoss06 Oct 2017 4:30 a.m. PST

I'm a big fan of the system, and have followed all the variants over the years. Like you've heard, its great advice buy the base game and give it a shot. See if you can recruit friends who also enjoy it. Each new army comes with its own special rules, which gives it a unique flavor (although only minor changes from the general rules). C&C:N: Generals, Marshals, and Tacticians give an alternate way of playing new decks of cards, only mildly more complex than the base game. Epic allows a way to play C&C:N with multiple players, if that's your thing.

I find the games to be quite fun, and it's a "go to" game for my gang when we're not sure what to do tonight.

Many complain about putting stickers on blocks. If you paint miniatures, the discipline to sit still for an evening to make something colorful should be second nature for you by now. I find if I plan an evening per side, the work is not overwhelming for me. You may also find a used game out there, already stickered up. And storage is a passion I enjoy tinkering with, for any large game.

One friend of mine put it beautifully -- he liked being able to play the Spanish without committing to having to paint up an entire army of them.

redbanner414506 Oct 2017 4:57 a.m. PST

They are easy, fun games but do not work for solitaire play.

acatcalledelvis06 Oct 2017 5:13 a.m. PST

They give you a game which is fun to play.

If you are looking for a game that gives any sort of Napoleonic flavour, or even representation of Napoleonic warfare this isn't it.

keithbarker06 Oct 2017 5:33 a.m. PST

I play CCN with figures.
The following might be of interest…
link

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 5:49 a.m. PST

OK, well a fair spread of opinion there!

I can tell you it's called Commands & Colors for a start

Hay Ho, that's the Internet for you an "s" here no "s" there!

It is rubbish. Don't bother if you like any other rule sets. They are not an intelligent set of rules, nor is there any period flavour.

Not a fan then? I'm not looking for a rule set. Just a game.

I find the games to be quite fun, and it's a "go to" game for my gang when we're not sure what to do tonight.

Yeah that's more the market I'm moving in.

Only played the Napoleonic one but it is a quick fun game – and 9 year olds can master it

Oh, might be over matching myself there then!

C&C:N: Generals, Marshals, and Tacticians give an alternate way of playing new decks of cards, only mildly more complex than the base game.

I had wondered about that one. Do you get value out of it if you only have the basic set? I thought there were a bunch of additions for armies that aren't in the original?

They are easy, fun games but do not work for solitaire play.

I've played other games with command cards by prioritising the fake players hands and then dicing to see which one actually gets played. Would that not work?

don't take my word for it, download the rules and scenario book and decide for yourself.

Yeah, now been there and done that. Thanks for the link that gives me something to ponder!

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 5:58 a.m. PST

Keith,

That looks very nice, the Kallistra terrain fits the idea like a glove, well done!

I fear my eyeballs are about twenty years beyond 6mm though!

I suppose you could do the same in 2/3mm then the wavering might not matter so much.

Personal logo Extra Crispy Sponsoring Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 6:21 a.m. PST

As mentioned above, great game, but just that – a game with a Napoleonci "skin."

Local gent round here does it with minis – 54mm on a home made hex mat (tho he does the ACW version).

Plastic army men for the various periods are a fun and very cheap way to play with figs (don't paint them, just be a kid again).

The Man With Two Bryans06 Oct 2017 6:42 a.m. PST

Spelligna issues aside, I can tell you that I like the Ancients game, but not so much the Napoleonics one as I don't feel it has any Napoleonic flavour. The system provides a quick, easy to play game, ideal for an evening. In fact you can usually get several games into a few hours.

On its own, it's a complete wargame in a box that existed before the Perrys brought out theirs. If you want a portable game, then Commands & Colors is it. You can, of course, make it less portable by getting one of the gaming mat businesses to knock you up a suitable hex-gridded cloth and use real figures. If you consider that a set also includes usable armies, then the price isn't bad because it is usable after just a few hours of sticking on labels.

A hex-gridded game has a number of virtues, one of them being that there are no arguments about distances and another being that it therefore eliminates the fiddly manoeuvres that Ancients players seem to love so much.

Some of the cards may seem unbalanced, and some scenarios really aren't very good in terms of the game they provide.

That all said, Commands & Colors is usually the first game I try out on a new player. Speed and simplicity are virtues.

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 7:05 a.m. PST

Mark,

As mentioned above, great game, but just that – a game with a Napoleonci "skin."

Yes I pretty much figured that one. I ask about feel so not as to prejudge peoples answers.

I assume the "the ACW version" you refer to is the old Battle Cry game?

RudyNelson06 Oct 2017 7:08 a.m. PST

I have seen the designer and staff for over two decades play testing all of the varrious systems starting with Battle Cry. They have always been play tested using miniatures. While they are a game and not a detailed simulation, specific rule mechanics have been integrated to reflect the era. They are fun games and not for day long battles.
For example the new American Revolution game seems to focus more on morale loss than other systems.
You will not know until you try one. As one guy suggested play a friend who has a copy or better yet at a convention.

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 7:11 a.m. PST

On its own, it's a complete wargame in a box that existed before the Perrys brought out theirs. If you want a portable game, then Commands & Colors is it.

You know, I never thought of it in those terms but you are right it is!

Of the two, while not knowing how either of them play, I'd take the C&C option on appearance and game support – no question.

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 7:13 a.m. PST

Thanks Rudy,

That backs up my feeling in the last line of my previous post.

Vintage Wargaming Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 8:31 a.m. PST

As a Miniatures game it's big selling point for me is speed – you can fight a big battle to a conclusion in a couple of hours.

If you are interested in the Napoleonic version with figures I'd suggest having a look at the Prometheus in Aspic blog:

link

The blogger Foy also has an English Civil/Thirty Years War adaptation which is interesting if you are into either of those conflicts.

The battle reports will give you an idea of how it plays – the recent Talavera write up has an interesting experiment with three separate commands (French, British and Spanish)

Personal logo ColCampbell Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 9:37 a.m. PST

We play C&C Napoleonics and Ancients with miniatures. Makes it look better, in our opinion. Fine pick-up game that is quick to learn.

Just played a Roman vs Carthaginian game (Battle of Zama) yesterday with 5 players. Romans won by the skin of their teeth.

Jim

BattleCaptain06 Oct 2017 10:17 a.m. PST

I've had fun playing C&C series games solo. There are simple adjustments available to compensate for the lack of hidden cards.

paul liddle06 Oct 2017 10:48 a.m. PST

It's the best wargame system I have ever bought into. I have never had a boring game with it.

I can play it solo easily by removing the First Strike card and just keeping the hands face down on the table and making the best moves I can for each side. The cards give a great narrative to the battle.

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 10:54 a.m. PST

Keep those solo suggestions coming boys!

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 11:37 a.m. PST

Trajanus:

I have all the Napoleonic sets as well as Battle Cry and Hold the Line, which is C&C like with command pips instead of cards, so that should tell you something about how much I enjoy the game system. I play it with miniatures too. There are some nice rules and mechanics and it's easy enough to pick up, but with lots of chrome. Lots of 'flavor' practically dumped on the system and challenging tactical [game] issues. It is also interesting to see how the designers 'interpreted' battlefields and national differences.

However, it has serious problems as a representation of Napoleonic warfare. The biggest problem is how the cards break up any movement. [Not that they do, but how they do it.] It isn't difficult to generate a sustained offensive, it is pretty much impossible unless you really luck out with the cards. What you find is little fights left, right and center that generally involve three or four units at a time with the cards for that section being spent. The interactions between units and combat can also be wonky from a historical standpoint. However, that kind of piecemeal, opportunistic dynamic works well with solo play.

The Marshal supplement is great, with more cards and some ways to mitigate the C&C play weaknesses. The Last supplement for mega games, I haven't tried yet, but does increase the complexity by a lot.

C&C is what it is, which is fun and fast. IF you are looking for something actually Napoleonic in play, you can be disappointed.

Marshal Mark06 Oct 2017 11:49 a.m. PST

It is rubbish. Don't bother if you like any other rule sets. They are not an intelligent set of rules, nor is there any period flavour.

What a strange thing to say. You may not like them, which is fine, but calling such a popular game "rubbish" and "not an intelligent set of rules" says more about you than it does about the game.
They may not be overly detailed, but there certainly is period flavour.

Trajanus06 Oct 2017 1:23 p.m. PST

The Marshal supplement is great, with more cards and some ways to mitigate the C&C play weaknesses

Yes l've heard elsewhere that that supplement makes the game to the extent that it doesn't matter even if you don't have all the National armies it gives additional stuff for, the cards are pretty much worth the bill on their own.

boy wundyr x Supporting Member of TMP Inactive Member06 Oct 2017 2:07 p.m. PST

I'm most familiar with the Naps version (still stickering Ancients and Tricorne is next), but I'd add that it helps to think of it as a very high level representation of the period(s), with friction built in to the way the cards work. So sometimes a flank just stalls out or you can't reinforce a critical point fast enough, but that happened to real commanders too.

coopman06 Oct 2017 3:14 p.m. PST

You soon learn not to start something in a sector of the map unless you have the appropriate cards that will allow you to activate your units for several turns in a row.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 4:30 p.m. PST

I'm most familiar with the Naps version (still stickering Ancients and Tricorne is next), but I'd add that it helps to think of it as a very high level representation of the period(s), with friction built in to the way the cards work. So sometimes a flank just stalls out or you can't reinforce a critical point fast enough, but that happened to real commanders too.

boy w:
It certainly is friction, but it isn't the way it happened to real commanders, not in the Napoleonic wars. For starters, Napoleonic commanders could move large formations all together, like Soult's Corps at Austerlitz or the French I Corps at Waterloo. Play those two C&C scenarios and try that… It's a great game but let's not bend space and time in imagining the actual Napoleonic battlefield dynamics are reflected by play even at the most abstract or 'gross' level. Major principles of war are represented, like concentrating fire or mass, etc.

You soon learn not to start something in a sector of the map unless you have the appropriate cards that will allow you to activate your units for several turns in a row.

coopman:

That's true to some extent. It all depends on how long you are willing to discard without actions until you do have the 'appropriate' cards… and hope the enemy doesn't have better cards…or at least in a section you have none.

There are all sorts of strategies and card play that can get rather sophisticated and effective, but as I said, that doesn't really mirror decisions and actions on the Napoleonic battlefield. It's a fun game with lots of 'flavor'.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP06 Oct 2017 4:33 p.m. PST

JOHN CSONKA:

John, good to see you around. Haven't been in contact in a long time. If you have the time, send me a line.

bhaggart@cebridge.net

Trajanus07 Oct 2017 3:54 a.m. PST

Right, having taken on board eveyones views and suggestions and being in possession of an Amazon Voucher to ease the pain, I decided to jump!

The Birthday gift covered the basic game and taking it on advice that the Marshal supplement jacked things up to a whole other level, I fronted that one myself.

The delivery guy arrived right in the middle of me typing this, so I guess there's a whole load of little blocks and stickers ahead!

Thanks for your time guys!

Clays Russians07 Oct 2017 4:40 p.m. PST

I absolutely love commands and colors and I think it does a fairly decent job of giving an eArly 19th century battle. Is it perfect? No, neither is empire version eleven (or what ever it's at now). The only thing I have heartburn over is that infantry dies so quickly. So- I put a 'dot' on one of the dice sides that have the fusilier image on it. This gives me a 1/2 hit instead of a full soldier hit. If you roll out 2 foot soldiers, a cannon and a retreat on 4 dice, and one of the foot soldiers has a dot on it, it is a 1/2 hit and therefore is deleted. If the two foot soldiers are without the dot that's 2 full hits, if both have the dot, that's 2 halves to make one ONE whole hit. I find this works a treat. I have the entire collection and even purchased an extra core game that I travel with. (. Yes it is a quintessential 'travel battle' for me.)
I also give the Russian line and jeager infantry 4 block regiments equal to the command card amount. Usually about five. The rest are at the 3 block level. But, you will get to that if you go down this slippery slope if you buy the Russian army set, expansion 2.
Solo play, I love solo play. I don't get many of our mates here in town interested in anything longer than 12 days it would seem so I rely on solo play a lot. I do exactly as Paul does, but I leave the first strike card in. If it's played I roll a D6, even it is played, odds it fails to play and is discarded.
Generals marshals and commanders give you new decks. Well worth it after having the game for a while but don't jump on it right away.
Epic- (20 hexes by 11) I love epic, grand battle not so much. (Not needed in my opinion) but epic is really a hoot. Don't try it with an odd number of players. You can do epic just fine with two players, works great. It also seems to do well with 3 per side, better than the grandbattle -which is even bigger than epic (26 hexes by 11)
You would, I believe be doing yourself a great disfavor not to try this in its full entirety over a period of time. I used to play and collect Napoleonics with and for empire systems, but let's face it, 2 hour turns? Some grognards love that level of detailed analytic play. I have 8 grandchildren- AND I am never gong to own 3000 Napoleonics, so yeah, I love those little wooden blocks. Time is very valuable to me, especially being retired now. (8 grandchildren)???
Naysayers, I think it actually does deliver on a broad brush application what a corp level battle would entail. Just because the action does shift to another flank (especially on the broader scale of epics) doesn't mean that THAT action didn't happen with in 5 minutes of the prior cards play on the opposite flank, or the center for that matter. Time in wargames is not the same as linear time we experience in everyday life. Remember the "variable time/length bound"?
Go for it man, it 'fired' so many other projects. Have fun, I love it.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP07 Oct 2017 5:15 p.m. PST

Naysayers, I think it actually does deliver on a broad brush application what a corp level battle would entail. Just because the action does shift to another flank (especially on the broader scale of epics) doesn't mean that THAT action didn't happen with in 5 minutes of the prior cards play on the opposite flank, or the center for that matter. Time in wargames is not the same as linear time we experience in everyday life. Remember the "variable time/length bound"?

Clay:
I love the game too. I think we need to avoid 1. rationalizing game mechanics after the fact and 2. what you mention was not what I was talking about.

Playing the cards randomly allow you to carry out particular actions on the board--most often in groups of 1 to 3 units, regardless of your plans or the tactical situation or the command system or size of the actual battle--and whatever 'time factor' is involved doesn't change the fracturing nature of the card dynamics. I just got done playing a large Memoir '44 game today. I had a blast. It was Omaha and Gold beach mega-scenario. I played the Germans, lost Gold but won on Omaha.

I was able to win on Omaha by collecting enough Right section and specialty cards to mount a winning panzer attack at the end of the game. I lost at Gold because I couldn't get the right cards to do that--as well as some mistakes on my part.

My choice of a counter attack on the right had nothing to do with the tactical situation or any plans for a defense I might have had at the beginning of the game. I attacked there because I happened to get those cards.

It was totally opportunistic, including how close I was in victory points at that moment. Of course, it was my brilliant play, but regardless of the very real friction that commanders had to deal with--and the cards can and do provide, that dynamic simply isn't the way command worked, at the Napoleonic or WWII levels. Yes, will all the friction etc. that they had to deal with.

There are a lot of neat things about the system and I would recommend it to anyone. It is a challenging game, but I am not going to say it does something that I would think is obvious that it doesn't do.

The introduction for C&C Napoleonics states:

The scale of the game fluctuates, which allows players to effectively portray Napoleonic battles, as well as smaller historical actions… The Napoleonic tactics you will need to execute to game victory conform remarkably well to the advantages and limitations inherent to the various Napoleonic National Armies of the day and the battlefield terrain features on which they fought…The stylized battlefield maps emphasize the important terrain features and highlight the historical deployment of forces in scale with the game system.

I have little idea about what they mean by 'conforms remarkably well' to the advantages and limitations of the armies and terrain. What they used as the historic 'form', the basis for that 'conforming' isn't at all clear to me. They certainly don't explain it. Note that command is not mentioned at all even though it is in the title of the game.

Richard Borg wrote that Battle Cry was "stylized
history". Nothing I have seen makes me believe that subsequent games based on the system are any different. There is a lot of flavor to the game system. I enjoy it.

I am looking forward to playing my first epic battles.

coopman07 Oct 2017 7:19 p.m. PST

The C&C games are like "wargame construction sets". They give you everything you need to wage war with the included battles, or you can make up your own scenarios within the components that come with the game. The follow-on modules add the forces of other nations to the mix. If you decide to replace the blocks with miniatures later on, you can certainly do that.

Trajanus08 Oct 2017 12:43 a.m. PST

At a slight tangent, has anyone used the cards in conjunction with other rules and Minatures?

It strikes me that you might have "Longstreet" for Napolonics, or at least the basis of a friction command element for a game, if you just used the Command Cards to organise the tactical/grand tactical movement as a way of corralling players.

Trajanus08 Oct 2017 1:36 a.m. PST

"stylized history"

I think that is a good description based on what I've seen so far. Given it comes from the Designer, even if it wasn't said directly about C&C, it's hard to disagree.

The obvious comment then is, so are many other rule systems in many other periods but for me that's not hard to except as a statement either.

I guess the quitting point comes when you can't see the history for the style or the game play.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP08 Oct 2017 8:10 a.m. PST

At a slight tangent, has anyone used the cards in conjunction with other rules and Minatures?

Captain and Kings, Field of Glory/Piquet, Sharp Practice,
Wings of Glory grin, Napoleonic Quick March, Die Fighting 1700-1900, Field of Glory—Napoleonic [Might count with tactical cards] Those are just off the top of my head.

Dynaman878908 Oct 2017 10:38 a.m. PST

I think he meant the cards that come in Commands and Colors, not cards in general.

Clays Russians08 Oct 2017 10:43 a.m. PST

McLaddie you have valid points that I agree with. The nuances of the game mechanics tho (to me) deliver the end result that would be the same. A period flavored battle with a believable result. True, the path traveled will differ in relation to history, but all wargames do this, it's just that I don't find it that much of an issue. Because of the fragmentation of the battlefield actions due to card play, I don't believe a solid time scale could possibly be applied to CC at all. This breaks the deal for some and I respect that. Can you margined trying to facilitate Antietam which is really a major battle with 5-6 lesser horrific battles happening throughout the day in chronological sequence? Nope, the cards cannot allow this.
I still find CC Napoleonic my favorite wargame system, (tho the ancient series IS a better simulation I believe, I do have both). As far as amassing and maneuvering large bodies of troops you are correct. It's beyond the scope of the design. Unless, you use and possess some of the cards from the Green or red decks. This doesn't cause me any angst whatsoever. I absolutely love the game, and the expansion decks and epic minus the grandebattialle made it my holy grail. Jesus, I sure am opinionated ain't I.
What's odd, is that I absolutely have zero interest in using the epic ancient deck or boards. None at all.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP08 Oct 2017 10:45 a.m. PST

I think he meant the cards that come in Commands and Colors, not cards in general.

Dynaman8789:

Oh. No. I don't see it as easily done because even the tactical cards are fairly specific within the C&C system.

Trajanus08 Oct 2017 10:53 a.m. PST

I think he meant the cards that come in Commands and Colors, not cards in general

Yes I did, although thought the Command Cards would be the ones to use as the Tactical Cards were too C&C specific, funnily enough.

mollinary08 Oct 2017 1:08 p.m. PST

Interesting comments Clays Russians. I love the overall system, and CC Ancients Epic is my absolute favourite! Not as a multi player game, but as a more complex and challenging game for two players. We find it can still be played to a conclusion in about 3 hours. It is the fact that you are allowed to play more than one card in a player turn which, along with the larger hands of cards, alleviates to some extent the artificial limitations imposed by the card deck. Overall, a great family of games. I have just purchased C&C Tricorne, so about to embark on another voyage of discovery!

Mollinary

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP08 Oct 2017 8:38 p.m. PST

Yes I did, although thought the Command Cards would be the ones to use as the Tactical Cards were too C&C specific, funnily enough.

grin I thought the command cards would require anyone using the to divide the table in to three sections, putting you right back into C&C for the most part, regardless of the combat rules or ranges.

Trajanus09 Oct 2017 3:32 a.m. PST

Well yes you need to do that but it just struck me it would be a useful aid to solo play if you have a favourite set of miniatures rules, or wanted to try out a new set before introducing other players to it, without having total control of both sides actions.

advocate10 Oct 2017 3:39 a.m. PST

I'd strongly suggest using something like Evil Bob's solution to storage: makes setting up and taking down so much easier:
link
Or if you have spare cash, I believe Saly4th do something lasercut.

Trajanus10 Oct 2017 4:32 a.m. PST

Yeah, certainly going to have to do something. Stickering is well under way so those little blocks are going to have to live somewhere.

I definitely not going to sort them every time I get the game out.

Not to mention that if I really like the system I'll expand. Probably restrict myself to the Peninsular as it's my main interest but that still means a whole bunch of Spanish to find a home for!

Trajanus10 Oct 2017 4:39 a.m. PST

Just looked at the Sally4th storage, looks a reasonable price for the amount of hassle saved.

May have to get some when I figure out how much I need, although they do an off the shelf insert for the basic game box that might be worth taking.

Personal logo McLaddie Supporting Member of TMP10 Oct 2017 5:54 a.m. PST

I use a plastic sorting set of drawers:

picture

The picture is just to give you an idea of what I'm talking about. They come in different sizes and drawer sizes, but any kind of sectioned storage container would work. A friend uses tupperware lock lid containers that are sectioned off inside.

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