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"Tiger - Panther question" Topic


19 Posts

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904 hits since 12 Apr 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

mwindsorfw Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 12:51 p.m. PST

What is the purpose for the textured armor that I sometimes see on the front and turrets of late-war Tigers and Panthers?

mollinary12 Apr 2017 12:58 p.m. PST

I think it is called 'zimmerit' and intended to keep magnetic mines away fromt the metal surface of the tank, thereby preventing them from sticking.

Mollinary

PJ ONeill12 Apr 2017 12:59 p.m. PST

As far as I know, it is a ceramic-clay coating to stop the attachment of magnetic mines.

mwindsorfw Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 1:00 p.m. PST

Thanks.

Personal logo wrgmr1 Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 1:31 p.m. PST

PJ is correct.

dsfrank12 Apr 2017 1:54 p.m. PST

Russians were particularly fond of magnetic mines so Zammerit was more common on the eastern front – but was around some on the western front

Personal logo Silurian Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 2:09 p.m. PST

On other tanks too. Here's a Brummbar in Rome.
[URL=http://s274.photobucket.com/user/Nautiloid/media/brummbar_zpsehwgipv1.jpg.html]

[/URL]

Mobius12 Apr 2017 2:25 p.m. PST

Germans and Japanese produced the only magnetic mines. They thought other countries would too but not so much. So, zimmerit was mostly a protection from their own mines.

Marc33594 Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 2:44 p.m. PST

Application was finally stopped late war. Here is an interesting article
link

Garand12 Apr 2017 2:45 p.m. PST

As an FYI Zimmerit was a mixture of PVC, sawdust, yellow ochre pigment & a couple other things. So from a modeling perspective if you wish to depict freshly chipped zimmerit, the color should be the same as the vehicle hull.

Zimmerit was usually factory applied to specific patterns at those factories, & cured with a blowtorch to speed up production. Some zimmerit was issued to front-line forces to be applied in the field, but that was much less common than the factory applied stuff.

Zimmerit was discontinued IIRC in Aug 1944 as there was no real threat from magnetic mines (see above), the Zimmerit could be flammable in certain conditions, and it slowed down production.

track-link.com/articles/15

Damon.

Hornswoggler12 Apr 2017 7:59 p.m. PST

Germans and Japanese produced the only magnetic mines. They thought other countries would too but not so much. So, zimmerit was mostly a protection from their own mines.

Certainly one of the more baffling Nazi solutions to a non-problem. I suppose we can only be grateful for the pointless waste of time and resources…

Personal logo Weasel Supporting Member of TMP12 Apr 2017 8:45 p.m. PST

In the event that you DID try to slab a magnetic mine on a zimmerit covered surface, how well did it actually work?

Hornswoggler12 Apr 2017 9:47 p.m. PST

Been a while since I was reading up on the topic but IIRC it was pretty darn effective.

BTW I have a list somewhere of all the vehicles so treated if anyone needs that info…

Marc the plastics fan13 Apr 2017 2:32 a.m. PST

Interesting how badly it was applied – nothing like as neat as I had always believed. Looks like a knife was scratched through it to make a grid pattern. Great thread

cosmicbank13 Apr 2017 6:22 a.m. PST

because its sexy like Black leather boots and riding crop

Marc33594 Supporting Member of TMP13 Apr 2017 6:42 a.m. PST

Hornswoggler the link I provided has such a list and clicking on the vehicle takes you to pictures of the vehicles.

Blutarski13 Apr 2017 7:25 a.m. PST

Back in my modeling days, I developed a way to apply a zimmerit finish to my 1:35 scale German AFV models that worked quite well:

Combine household spackling compound + some water-bsed paint of the desired color + a bit of water, mixed to create a smooth paste of suitable consistency ("not too thick, not too thin"). Getting the consistency right is the trickiest bit, but it is not terribly difficult.

Apply to the areas of the vehicle model that were customarily coated with zimmerit, then use a hobby saw blade to create the texture. An X-Acto saw blade worked great for texturing on 1:35 scale models. Let dry completely, then add a dark wash and/or highlight and it gives a nice 3D presence.

Caveat – I have no idea as to how well this technique might work with wargame scale models.

Andy ONeill13 Apr 2017 11:53 a.m. PST

The texture of zimmerit helped camouflage vehicles somewhat.
So there was some benefit, just not so much as to make it worth the trouble.

Hornswoggler13 Apr 2017 6:14 p.m. PST

Hornswoggler the link I provided has such a list and clicking on the vehicle takes you to pictures of the vehicles.

Thanks, I noticed that later on. Will be interested to check for completeness when I have a moment…

Caveat I have no idea as to how well this technique might work with wargame scale models.

There are various techniques that work on smaller than 1/35 models provided one is sufficiently patient. Or just buy PSC Panthers with the "zim" already moulded on !

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