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"Do You Need a Brewster?" Topic


22 Posts

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1,015 hits since 5 Apr 2017
©1994-2017 Bill Armintrout
Comments or corrections?

Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian05 Apr 2017 5:53 p.m. PST

Most of you will be aware of the ship Mayflower, which brought the Pilgrims to America in 1620 (at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts).

There were 102 passengers on the Mayflower. Of these, 31 adults are known to have descendants.

In 1897, the Mayflower Society was formed, composed of those who could document their descent from one of the Mayflower passengers. Tracking one's lineage to the Mayflower – and particularly William Brewster, their leader – was considered very desirable.

Arsenic and Old Lace, Joseph Kesselring's play which eventually became the Frank Capra movie staring Cary Grant, was a black comedy which poked fun at the fascination with prestigious ancestors. The play is about the Brewster family, descended from the "Mayflower," but these Brewsters have all gone insane!

If you need a 'blue blood' (or insane!) character name for an American, keep 'Brewster' in mind. grin

While on my flu-induced 'vacation', I was surprised to discover William Brewster in my own family history! It's not a direct connection, however – it is by way of my great-uncle's step-daughter's husband. grin

Personal logo ochoin Supporting Member of TMP05 Apr 2017 6:20 p.m. PST

A Brewster Buffalo:

picture

Anyone sending these up against Zeros was clearly insane.

Read on:


link
https://www.warbirdforum.com/saga.htm

zoneofcontrol Inactive Member05 Apr 2017 6:29 p.m. PST

Congratulations on your insanity!

As a kid back in the 60s, I attended a family reunion where someone had done some genealogy research and found a connection to Mary Todd who is also known as Mrs. Abraham Lincoln. So, I clearly don't have to worry about mental issues in my family. And… neither do I.

My closest connection to the Mayflower is the fact that there was a Mayflower Movers office across the street from my church's Knights of Columbus club. My parents parked in their lot when we attended events there. And so did my parents.

rmaker05 Apr 2017 6:37 p.m. PST

Arsenic and Old Lace, Joseph Kesselring's play which eventually became the Frank Capra movie staring Cary Grant, was a black comedy which poked fun at the fascination with prestigious ancestors. The play is about the Brewster family, descended from the "Mayflower," but these Brewsters have all gone insane!

"Insanity runs in some families. In ours, it gallops." – Mortimer Brewster

Personal logo Coyotepunc and Hatshepsuut Supporting Member of TMP05 Apr 2017 7:05 p.m. PST

I need a brew, not a Brewster.

Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian05 Apr 2017 7:37 p.m. PST

Anyone sending these up against Zeros was clearly insane.

They worked great for the Finns! grin

Chris Wimbrow05 Apr 2017 7:51 p.m. PST

A couple of young men arrived in Virginia on the same ship in 1621. One produced the line of my wife. The other, me.

Genealogy can be fun.

And the Brewster is butt ugly.

Personal logo Editor in Chief Bill The Editor of TMP Fezian05 Apr 2017 9:54 p.m. PST

A couple of young men arrived in Virginia on the same ship in 1621. One produced the line of my wife.

Usually, a woman is required… evil grin

Personal logo Bashytubits Supporting Member of TMP05 Apr 2017 9:58 p.m. PST

I can 3d print one of those if anyone is interested.

Hafen von Schlockenberg Supporting Member of TMP06 Apr 2017 12:05 a.m. PST

What,a woman? Your skills have obviously taken a big step forward!

Chris Wimbrow06 Apr 2017 1:15 a.m. PST

That's a problem with genealogy. Standard procedure tends to erase the woman's maiden last name.

Notice my last name is not Nottingham, nor my wife's Montague.

Supercilius Maximus06 Apr 2017 3:48 a.m. PST

Is it Capulet?

DrSkull Supporting Member of TMP06 Apr 2017 5:33 a.m. PST

Brewster Body Shield

link

Winston Smith Supporting Member of TMP06 Apr 2017 6:24 a.m. PST

Genealogy is a classic example of being proud of something you have absolutely no control over.

Personal logo StoneMtnMinis Supporting Member of TMP06 Apr 2017 6:55 a.m. PST

Brewsters in Finnish service:
"First off, the Finnish Brewsters weren't Brewster Buffaloes, or Brewster 339's, or F2A-2, which were very bad fighters. They were Model 239's much closer to the original USN F2A-1, which were reported to be delightful to fly. Finnish nickname "Taivaan Helmi" "Pearl of the Skies" reflects this."

warbirdforum.com/faf.htm

Matsuru Sami Kaze06 Apr 2017 7:35 a.m. PST

The Finns also knew the Brewster as the Butt-Walter because of the "BW" marking on the tail. They got fifty of them after the Winter War. Finn engineers shed the aircraft of its Raft, armor, tailhook, and had a much lighter, faster aircraft. They tinkered with ignition and power output to goose the speed. I read a quote somewhere: "…it could turn in a phonebooth."
Competing against poorly trained Russian flyers in late thirties aircraft, the Sky Pearls did very well with exchange rate something like 26-1. By the time Yaks and Lavotchkins showed up, the Finns jumped to imported Me-109G models. Didn't hurt that the Fighter Squadrons had the best Finn pilots. There didn't seem to be a bomber arm of any consequence.
My favorite story was about the Finn who pasted beer bottle labels on his aircraft to count kills. dude.

Tom D106 Apr 2017 1:54 p.m. PST

Poor Mary Tod Lincoln. Three of her 4 sons predeceased her, her husband was shot dead in front of her, and her surviving son petitioned to have her committed. I don't know how well my mental faculties would have survived such onslaughts.

Gustav A Inactive Member06 Apr 2017 2:57 p.m. PST

There didn't seem to be a bomber arm of any consequence.

The Finns had "Flyging Regiment 4" (Lentorykmentti 4) which was made up of 4 bomber squadrons and there was an additional maritime bomber squadron in Flying Regiment 5. But the bomber force has never gotten the same attention as the more famous fighter squadrons even tough it made important contributions on several occasions. (Such as the air strikes during the 1944 battle for Tali-Ihantala.)

Personal logo capncarp Supporting Member of TMP06 Apr 2017 9:55 p.m. PST

ISTR the Finns replaced the factory engines with different ones which overcame much of the problems inherent with the US- and British-operated models.

Lonkka1Actual07 Apr 2017 5:19 a.m. PST

Capncarp,
most certainly no engines were replaced as no such were on hand. Beggars & choosers you see…


Matsuru Sami Kaze
After Germans finally allowed sales of Bf109G to Finland, we mot certainly didn't ditch Brewsters but they were kept in the front lines and were used throughout the Continuation War and actually in Lappland War (I think bf109s didn't participate in that war). They were, after all the 2nd best fighter we had available.

I seem to recall that the Brewster kill ratio is unrivalled. 26 – 1 is for the whole Continuation War 41-44. Apparently in '41 it was WAY better (like 67.5 – 1)…


Gustav A is sopt on about the bombers.
For most part they were used in small quantities (in Winter War Blenheims, which were just a teeny bit slower than Russian fighters, usually operated with just one plane.

Most notable bombers:
97/99 Blenheim I/IV (number depends on how you count them)
24 Junkers Ju 88
24 Tupolev SB-2/SB-3
15 Dornier Do 17Z
4 Iljushin DB-3
4 Iljushin IL-4

Less notable ones:
35 Fokker C.X
15 Fokker C.V

foxweasel Supporting Member of TMP07 Apr 2017 11:44 a.m. PST

Bill, I was in Gainsborough (Lincolnshire, England) today taking the kids to the old hall. I remembered this topic when I arrived at the hall, inside they have a small exhibition on the Pilgrim Fathers. Most of those who sailed on the Mayflower came from NW Lincolnshire and NE Nottinghamshire. Sure enough there was quite a bit written about the Brewsters.

Personal logo capncarp Supporting Member of TMP07 Apr 2017 9:56 p.m. PST

Lonkaa1Actual: "most certainly no engines were replaced as no such were on hand. Beggars & choosers you see"
I stand corrected: the version (Model 239) that was shipped to Finland had a _different_ engine from the standard Buffalos, and therefore lucked out.

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