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"Detail on Tiny 3-Inch-Long 3D Printed Ship Will Amaze You" Topic


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huevans01118 Apr 2015 4:18 a.m. PST

"The Detail on This Tiny 3-Inch-Long 3D Printed Ship Will Amaze You"

Check out the level of detail on this tiny ship.


"When we talk about 3D printing, one of the first benefits of the technology that most people will bring up is its ability to create completely custom objects. We aren't just talking about custom colors and designs, but about designing an object from the ground up tailored to each and every individual's needs. While 3D printing is great for prototyping, this is one reason why the technology is beginning to make its mark in the creation of end-use products as well.

Sure, 3D printing definitely has an advantage over more traditional injection molding techniques when it comes to creating custom one-off items, but what happens when we need high quality, highly detailed products? Can 3D printing also compete there?

ship1One Russian company, called Invent Prototyping, seems to have that answer which depicted in a tiny 79.75mm-(3.13 inch)-long model ship, built on a very high quality industrial level 3D printer.

Invent Prototyping is currently one of the oldest rapid prototyping companies located in Russia. They have five professional 3D printers that utilize different technologies, as well as a 3D scanner with an accuracy of +/- 7 microns. Their headquarters are located in Saint Petersburg, although they tell us that they have customers from all around the world. One of these customers recently approached them in order to have a very tiny boat 3D printed, a challenge which the company was certainly up for.

As you can see in the photos, the ship, which measures just 15.3mm (0.6 inches) high, has extremely detailed components which all remained intact throughout the printing process. Made up of a hard ABS-like plastic, it is also quite sturdy. This goes to show that 3D printing can hold up quite well when it comes to creating highly detailed end-use products. Of course not all 3D printers are created equal, and the majority of your desktop FFF-based printers would not be capable of this. However, an ever-growing list of companies around the world now offer services using these high end printers from 3D Systems and others, meaning just about everyone can now have access.

What do you think about this incredible 3D printed ship, made by one of Russia's most respected 3D printing companies, thanks to the ProJet 3500 HD Max 3D printer by 3D Systems? Discuss in the 3-Inch-Long 3D Printed Ship forum thread on 3DPB.com."

link

Personal logo Florida Tory Supporting Member of TMP18 Apr 2015 5:15 a.m. PST

Here is a previous discussion

TMP link

The Kingmaker Inactive Member18 Apr 2015 7:26 a.m. PST

It is a nice model, but the article said it took 11 hours to print. That means the company either lost money doing it or had to charge a lot for the work.

I think the ability to get the detail exists, but it has to be economically viable for use as a tool to make mass market products.

Prototyping is a different deal in that a client is investing money to build a model of something that will probably be manufactured in a much more profitable manner. The high cost of making the model is part of the costs associated with design and are recovered through sales of many units.

Kevin

Jcfrog Supporting Member of TMP18 Apr 2015 9:32 a.m. PST

This is probably one way to the future. It makes one's imagination vibrant with possibilities, and not just for ships.

huevans01118 Apr 2015 9:44 a.m. PST

It is a nice model, but the article said it took 11 hours to print. That means the company either lost money doing it or had to charge a lot for the work.

I think the ability to get the detail exists, but it has to be economically viable for use as a tool to make mass market products.

Prototyping is a different deal in that a client is investing money to build a model of something that will probably be manufactured in a much more profitable manner. The high cost of making the model is part of the costs associated with design and are recovered through sales of many units.

Kevin

Yes, I noticed the time taken as well and came to pretty much the same conclusion you have. OTOH, the tech will improve and the model looks very good.

Zephyr118 Apr 2015 2:20 p.m. PST

Another 50 years and the level of 3-D printing will allow working engines and guns on models that size… ;-)

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