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"ship basing - tips, tricks or buys for ocean?" Topic


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1,055 hits since 22 Nov 2012
©1994-2014 Bill Armintrout
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Grandviewroad Inactive Member22 Nov 2012 8:21 p.m. PST

I'm gaming WWII DD actions in 1/700 – so the usual 1/2400 or 1/3000 tricks aren't going to cut it here. I'd like to give the bases some half-decent attempt at looking like ocean, even if it isn't diorama quality. I've posted at my favorite ship modeling site, but friends, they are usually way beyond my level there. Still, might help.

Thought I'd check in here also in case there were some easier ways for a decent ocean look, perhaps some textured materials that imitate waves, etc.

Suggestions appreciated.

Personal logo The Editor The Editor of TMP Fezian22 Nov 2012 8:43 p.m. PST

I used to use a gel product that was available from craft stores, but I can't find it listed any more – it was a white, thick liquid that dried clear, and you could make waves out of it.

Might be similar to Delta Ceramcoat Texture Builder, which you add to acrylic paint to get texture.

Renaissance Ink's Flocking Gel -- Extra Fine would also work.

Personal logo Arteis Supporting Member of TMP22 Nov 2012 8:53 p.m. PST

I'm going to go out on a limb here, and say the best looking ones are model ships without bases at all (or, at a pinch, with just a bit of roughly-edged modelled froth at the bow and along the sides). Although I like textured bases for land troops, I always think they look rather odd on ships.

Personal logo vojvoda Supporting Member of TMP23 Nov 2012 3:12 a.m. PST

Renaissance Ink makes some very good gel that I would recommend. As for basing I would recommend RI supper thin bases. They are very stong and very low profile.
VR
James Mattes

Dexter Ward23 Nov 2012 3:26 a.m. PST

You need bases on ships both to identify them and to avoid damage when they are picked up.
Here's what I do.
Paint base a deep blue green (I use phthalocyanine green)
Glue ship + label to base
Cover base (and label) with acrylic clear texture gel (buy from art shops). This goes on milky but dries clear.
Add bow wave(s), and I find tapping the gel with a palette knife gives a nice wave pattern.
Leave to dry (about 24 hours), highlight bow wave and wave tops very lightly with off white.

Maddaz111 Sponsoring Member of TMP23 Nov 2012 6:56 a.m. PST

I have glued Some of my ships to a thin (2-3mm thick) plastic that is completely transparent.
I have modelled the bow and stern wave and some turbidity along the sides using a clear paste and inking, with white foam tops and varnishing

Painted a hull shape underneath as a very dark grey so that someone looking up (when planned to do a three level plastic sheet game) would see a hull shape in the water

I may have models in the storage locker (and please do not ask why it is only may) and if I find them when I visit again next month, I will email photos if anyone is interested.

I also had fall of shot markers and splash ladders made of transparent flexi plastic with tufts of plastic rod painted white and coated with clear gel/realistic water/pva/gloss varnish/ some other products since forgotten. at least one set of rules we used had an increasing minus for each ship targeting after the first ship and each fall of shot marker was placed to show that!

bandit86 Supporting Member of TMP23 Nov 2012 8:34 a.m. PST

I used tissue paper and white glue. Worked for me for what I wanted

picture

Grandviewroad Inactive Member23 Nov 2012 7:54 p.m. PST

One advantage about the clear base with bow wake, is that it is fast, and the ship perfectly matches anything you put the model on. That may be my starting point.

Anyone recommend clear plastic that is easy to cut, about 1-2mm thick and a cutting method? I'd like something stiff and thick enough for gamers to handle without touching the 1/700 plastic models.

I like the idea of adding the bow wake on, also, can go back to do that later.

Personal logo Ditto TwoThree Supporting Member of TMP24 Nov 2012 10:39 p.m. PST

Bandit66, that is freakinggorgeous! thumbs up thumbs up

My examples are not WWII but illustrate what I've done in other naval genres.

I based my very small 1:1200 sailing vessels by Langton on clear plastic. Here's images for which I apologize for posting for the ten zillionth time, but it will give you an idea. I use clear plastic I just cut it myself from one of those clear plastic frames photo frames. I add glue from a glue gun and dry brush it a whitish colour:

picture

picture

Full article is here:

ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/aos

I never did finish my Age of sail project after completing only three vessels. I've since read about Woodland Scenics Water Effects which I will use if and when I resume this project.

WRT 1:700 scale, GrandViewRoad, I'd personally not base the vessels. I don't know of you came to wargaming through modeling but my friends and I did and we handle such models carefully. Here's a couple of shots from my ACW naval at 1:600 scale:

Monitors:

picture

A paddle wheel on fire:

picture

USS Hartford about to get whacked by a torpedo boat (which is based here because it was cast based by Thoroughbred):

picture

From this link:

link

Personally, I think the larger models look better unbased and as you can see my 1:600 ACW stuff has rigging an fiddly bits, but have not been physically damaged.

Again, apologies for not being WWII, but I just wanted to show you unbased ships. I think at 1:700 scale, your vessels will be easily individually recognizable and as long as you are not playing with gorillas laugh you should be OK.

On the other hand, there's nothing wrong with basing either, of course, to each his own! grin
--
Tim

Grandviewroad Inactive Member26 Nov 2012 7:12 p.m. PST

Ditto – what did you use to cut the plastic?

Also, what are your ACW models sailing on? the ripples aren't quite to scale – they look too large compared to the ships – but it is still a nice effect.

chironex02 Dec 2012 5:15 p.m. PST

Ditto, that may work for the ironclads but the wooden ships should have something for someone to grab other than the rig, which they will. Also helps stability.
My water effects are usually made by painting the base first, then sludging on hot glue, lowlighting, and then applying layers of Realist Water from Back 2 Base-ix, which can be textured with a thick-bristled brush when it's half-set and then drybrushed over when completely set.



Quite versatile stuff:
link
link
That last one required several applications. I shouldn't think it economical if you wanted to build a very large pond or swamp, or a model railway layout(it comes in a 30gm bottle for 7AUD), but is great for gaming applications like bases and small scenic features.
Or scratchbuilding oozes.

Personal logo Arteis Supporting Member of TMP03 Dec 2012 12:53 a.m. PST

These are my homemade balsa wood ships, with no bases, but just placed on some bubble plastic for these photos:

link

picture

picture

picture

picture

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:49 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

Pictures here: link

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:51 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

Pictures at my Flickr page: link

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:52 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

Pictures at my Flickr page.

link

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:54 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

Pictures at my Flickr page.

flic.kr/s/aHsjrkNn3Q

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:57 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

Pictures at my Flickr page.


Cruisers and destroyers by khall39, on Flickr

Ken Hall10 Dec 2012 12:57 p.m. PST

@Arteis, I like your scratchbuilds. They look like Paul Hague's stuff from his Sea Battles in Miniature (great book).

For destroyers I use half-inch steel band of the type used in shipping, cut to length and painted. I carry my ships in drawers lined with business-card magnets, so it works well. for battleships and carriers, I broke down and bought myself a 300-foot roll of 3/4" band from a supply house; it will last me the rest of my natural life, even were I a Dunadan. :-)

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